Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.

Initially, engineer Niniane Wang didn't want to go public with sex harassment allegations because she worried it would jeopardize her relationships with other investors. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune

How A Female Engineer Built A Public Case Against A Sexual Harasser In Silicon Valley

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Ellen Pao sued her former employer, the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caulfield and Byers, alleging she was discriminated against and sexually harassed. She lost the case but is seen as a leading voice on harassment in Silicon Valley. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Struggling For Investments, Silicon Valley Women Reluctant To Speak Out On Harassment

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This April 3 photo, taken in Washington, DC, shows President Donald Trump's Twitter feed. Some Twitter users argue Trump is violating the First Amendment by blocking people from his feed after they posted negative comments. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

First Amendment Advocates Charge Trump Can't Block Critics On Twitter

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

How Russian Propaganda Spreads On Social Media

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Netflix CEO Reed Hastings delivers a keynote address at CES 2016 in Las Vegas. He has admitted facing Amazon in video is a challenge. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Once Dominant, Netflix Faces An Increasing Number Of Video Challengers

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On Walk Under Ladders, Joan Armatrading makes a leap to a more pop sound without losing the distinct mix of styles of her previous work. Graham Wood/Getty Images hide caption

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Police form a perimeter around the road leading to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino after a gunman killed 59 people and injured more than 500 others when he opened fire Sunday night on a country music concert in Las Vegas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Google Spread Misinformation About Las Vegas Shooting. What Went Wrong?

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For months, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had claimed that security experts at Facebook had found no evidence of Russians involved in fake news. Now, Facebook is turning over thousands of ads to Congress it said had been placed by a Russian agency. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Russian-Linked Election Ads Highlight Scope Of Facebook's Power

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Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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Apple Unveils Highly Anticipated iPhone 10 To Mark Device's Anniversary

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A drone is flown during a property inspection following Hurricane Harvey in Houston. The mass destruction brought on by Harvey has been a seminal moment for drone operators, proving that they can effectively map flooding, locate people in need of rescue and verify damage to speed insurance claims. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

White nationalist Richard Spencer's free speech fight against Google, Facebook and other tech companies has some unlikely support from the left. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Unlikely Allies Join Fight To Protect Free Speech On The Internet

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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David Brown of Plymouth, Mass., sends a message during a protest Sunday, held in response to a white nationalist rally that spiraled into deadly violence in Charlottesville, Va., the day before. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Some Are Troubled By Online Shaming Of Charlottesville Rally Participants

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