Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
Laura Sydell
NPR/N/A

Laura Sydell

Correspondent, Arts Desk

Laura Sydell fell in love with the intimate storytelling qualities of radio, which combined her passion for theatre and writing with her addiction to news. Over her career she has covered politics, arts, media, religion, and entrepreneurship. Currently Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and NPR.org.

Sydell's work focuses on the ways in which technology is transforming our culture and how we live. For example, she reported on robotic orchestras and independent musicians who find the Internet is a better friend than a record label as well as ways technology is changing human relationships.

Sydell has traveled through India and China to look at the impact of technology on developing nations. In China, she reported how American television programs like Lost broke past China's censors and found a devoted following among the emerging Chinese middle class. She found in India that cell phones are the computer of the masses.

Sydell teamed up with Alex Bloomberg of NPR's Planet Money team and reported on the impact of patent trolls on business and innovations particular to the tech world. The results were a series of pieces that appeared on This American Life and All Things Considered. The hour long program on This American Life "When Patents Attack! - Part 1," was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and accolades from Investigative Reporters and Editors. A transcript of the entire show was included in The Best Business Writing of 2011 published by Columbia University Press.

Before joining NPR in 2003, Sydell served as a senior technology reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where her reporting focused on the human impact of new technologies and the personalities behind the Silicon Valley boom and bust.

Sydell is a proud native of New Jersey and prior to making a pilgrimage to California and taking up yoga she worked as a reporter for NPR Member Station WNYC in New York. Her reporting on race relations, city politics, and arts was honored with numerous awards from organizations such as The Newswomen's Club of New York, The New York Press Club, and The Society of Professional Journalists.

American Women in Radio and Television, The National Federation of Community Broadcasters, and Women in Communications have all honored Sydell for her long-form radio documentary work focused on individuals whose life experiences turned them into activists.

After finishing a one-year fellowship with the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, Sydell came to San Francisco as a teaching fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California, Berkeley.

Sydell graduated Magna Cum Laude with a bachelor's degree from William Smith College in Geneva, New York, and earned a J.D. from Yeshiva University's Cardozo School of Law.

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Story Archive

A protester holds up a sign targeting Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff outside the company's headquarters in San Francisco on Monday. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Tech Workers Demand CEOs Stop Doing Business With ICE, Other U.S. Agencies

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Siri, Alexa and Cortana all started out as female. Now a group of marketing executives, tech experts and academics are trying to make virtual assistants more egalitarian. Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images/Blend Images

The Push For A Gender-Neutral Siri

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LA Port Will Likely Feel Effects From U.S.-China Trade War

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IBM Touts Breakthrough Technology As Computer Debates A Person

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News Brief: Primary Results, Facebook In China, '3-Parent Babies'

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Facebook Says It Shared Users' Data With Chinese Companies

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Apple CEO Tim Cook Says Company Hasn't Collected Data Available From Facebook

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Tim Cook visited the NPR offices in Washington, D.C., in 2015. On Monday, he spoke with NPR about Apple users' privacy and the importance of trade to global relationships. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple Requested 'Zero' Personal Data In Deals With Facebook, CEO Tim Cook Says

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A child plays with a mobile phone while riding in a New York subway in December. Two major Apple investors urged the iPhone maker to take action to curb growing smartphone use among children. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

In California, an initiative expected on November's ballot would be one of the broadest online privacy regulations in the U.S. traffic_analyzer/Getty Images hide caption

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Do Not Sell My Personal Information: California Eyes Data Privacy Measure

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A 360-degree camera is used to document the Khe Min Ga Zedi temple in Bagan, Myanmar. Kieran Kesner for CyArk hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for CyArk

3D Scans Help Preserve History, But Who Should Own Them?

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Advocates Question Facebook's Latest Effort To Protect Data

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Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg Tries To Move Company Forward After Data Scandal

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Slower Than Expected iPhone X Sales Likely To Hurt Apple's Earnings

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