Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Speculation Swirls Around Two Names For Supreme Court Slot

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Trump Expected To Announce Supreme Court Nominee This Week

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Judge William Pryor, U.S. Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit, moderates a panel discussion during the Federalist Society's National Lawyers Convention in Washington in November 2016. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Simon Tam, a member of the band The Slants, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Russell/NPR

Supreme Court Considers Trademark Battle Over Band Name

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Joe Jiang (left) and Simon Tam of The Slants are in a legal battle at the Supreme Court over their band's name. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

In Battle Over Band Name, Supreme Court Considers Free Speech And Trademarks

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A case before the Supreme Court questions what public schools' responsibilities are to students with disabilities. Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Considers How Schools Support Students With Disabilities

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Jeff Sessions Previously Denied Federal Judgeship Amid Racism Controversy

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The Supreme Court, pictured on election night. Republican President-elect Donald Trump now stands to reshape the court in his image, potentially for a generation. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

From Delay To Action: The Supreme Court To Take A Conservative Turn In 2017

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For Supreme Court, 2016 Had More Question Marks Than Certainty

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A banner for State Farm insurance in in D`Iberville, Miss., tells property owners the number to call after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that considers the influences of race and politics in redistricting on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Considers Race, Politics And Redistricting In 2 Cases

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear cases on whether lawmakers in Virginia and North Carolina weighed race too heavily when redrawing congressional districts. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Questions Of Race And Redistricting Return To The Supreme Court

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