Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Chief Justice John Roberts, who is presiding over President Trump's Senate impeachment trial, declined Thursday to read a question submitted by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. Senate television/AP hide caption

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Senate television/AP

Chief Justice Roberts Navigates Shoals Of The Impeachment Trial

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Kendra Espinoza stands with her daughters outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Espinoza is the lead plaintiff in a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Could Be Headed To A Major Unraveling Of Public School Funding

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Supreme Court Hears Arguments In Montana Case About Tax Credits For Religious Schools

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Kendra Espinoza, the lead plaintiff in the case, has two daughters attending Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. She is an office manager and staff accountant who works extra jobs to pay for her children's tuition. Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice hide caption

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Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice

Supreme Court Considers Religious Schools Case

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Brock Ervin holds a sign outside the Indiana House chamber before the 11 representatives of the Electoral College gathered on Dec. 19, 2016, in Indianapolis. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear two cases challenging state attempts to penalize Electoral College delegates who fail to vote for the presidential candidate they were pledged to support. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

"OK, boomer" made its first appearance in the Supreme Court Wednesday, invoked by Chief Justice John Roberts, seen here in February 2019, in an age-discrimination case. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Chief Justice Roberts: Is 'OK, Boomer' Evidence Of Age Discrimination?

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether to throw out the convictions of Bridget Anne Kelly and William Baroni Jr., who were convicted in the "Bridgegate" scandal. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

When Is Abuse Of Power A Crime? Supreme Court Answer May Come In 'Bridgegate' Scandal

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Supreme Court Hears Arguments On New Jersey 'Bridgegate' Case

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Traffic crosses the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee, N.J. The bridge made headlines in 2013 when two access lanes were shut down, creating gridlock — and a political scandal. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

At Supreme Court, Another Potential Loss For Prosecutors Fighting Public Corruption

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Chief Justice John Roberts (left) stands with his colleagues on the 2014 Supreme Court. Unlike during the Clinton impeachment trial, the membership and the direction of the court has changed in the past few years. Larry Downing/AP hide caption

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Larry Downing/AP

At Impeachment Trial, Chief Justice Roberts May Have More Prestige Than Power

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A Look At How The Supreme Court Chief Justice May Preside Over Senate Impeachment

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Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and Minority Leader Tom Daschle, shown in this video image from February 1999, speak during the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton on the Senate floor. AP hide caption

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President Trump speaks during a meeting at the White House Friday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court Agrees To Hear Trump Subpoena Cases

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