Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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The Supreme Court hears two cases about ineffective lawyers on Monday.

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Cases Tied To Dubious Legal Advice Reach High Court

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Albert Florence (right) sits at his home in Bordentown, N.J., on Tuesday with his attorney Susan Chana Lask. He challenged his strip search after a wrongful arrest on minor charges.

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Mel Evans/AP

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments for a case testing whether prison guards may constitutionally strip search even minor traffic offenders when they are arrested and taken to jail.

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Clarence Thomas took his oath of office on Oct. 23, 1991.

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Thomas Confirmation Hearings Had Ripple Effect

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As visitors lined up outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices grappled with the question of when churches might be exempt from certain federal laws.

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Justice John Paul Stevens (right) stands with newly sworn-in Chief Justice John Roberts in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in October 2005. Stevens' new book, Five Chiefs, is a discussion about the office of chief justice, featuring detailed profiles of the five Stevens knew well: Fred Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren Burger, William Rehnquist and John Roberts.

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The Supreme Court begins a new term on Monday. Among the issues that will be on the docket: immigration, affirmative action, gay marriage and Medicaid. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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