Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Ginsburg and Justice Antonin Scalia ride an elephant in India in 1994. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/Dey Street Books hide caption

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Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/Dey Street Books

Notorious RBG: The Supreme Court Justice Turned Cultural Icon

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People line up outside the Supreme Court Tuesday ahead of arguments in Montgomery v. Louisiana, a case looking at whether a 2012 high court decision regarding mandatory life sentences should apply retroactively. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court Hears Arguments On Resentencing For Juvenile Lifers

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Will Supreme Court Allow Juvenile Life Sentence Ruling To Be Retroactive?

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A gurney in Huntsville, Texas, where prisoners are executed. The death penalty was at the Supreme Court again Wednesday. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Death Penalty Back At The Supreme Court In New Term

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People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in March. There is a public line and a separate line reserved for members of the Supreme Court bar. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Supreme Court To Lawyers: Hold Your Own Place In Line

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Supreme Court Faces Controversial Docket As New Term Opens

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An American flag flies over the Supreme Court in June. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Supreme Court's New Term: Here's What To Watch

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In his new book, The Court and the World: American Law and the New Global Realities, Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer details why American courts no longer have any choice about involving themselves in the law beyond U.S. borders. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Law Beyond Our Borders: Justice Breyer Is On A Mission

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As different as their backgrounds were, and even their approaches to judging, when it came to women's rights, Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) and Sandra Day O'Connor were allies. Courtesy of HarperCollins hide caption

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Courtesy of HarperCollins

Ruth Bader Ginsburg And Sandra Day O'Connor, 'Sisters In Law'

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Coda To A Cold Case: The Mystery Of The Stolen Stradivarius, Resolved

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Documentation of Roman Totenberg's Stradivarius violin. The instrument went missing after one of Roman's concerts but was rediscovered more than three decades later. Courtesy of the Totenberg family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Totenberg family

A Rarity Reclaimed: Stolen Stradivarius Recovered After 35 Years

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Frederik de Pue whisks mayonnaise, instead of raw eggs, into his bearnaise sauce. Ted Robbins/NPR hide caption

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Ted Robbins/NPR

How To Hack Béarnaise, A Mother Of A French Sauce

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Judicial Differences Take Center Stage In 'Scalia V. Ginsburg'

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Speaking about why her conservative colleagues wrote so many dissents this term, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg smiled and said: "Next term I think you'll see some of my colleagues will be more disciplined." Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP