Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.

Justice Ginsburg Expected Back On The Bench Soon After Surgery

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State Reps. Barry Moore, Joe Hubbard, Rod Scott and Merika Coleman study a map of the proposed redistricting plan in May 2012 following a meeting of the Legislative Committee on Reapportionment at the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery, Ala. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

At The Supreme Court, Tracing A Fine Line Between Politics And Race

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The question before the Supreme Court Wednesday is: Did Alabama's Republican-dominated Legislature rely predominantly on race or on partisanship when it was redrawing its districts? Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Supreme Court Case Seeks Source Of Alabama Gerrymandering

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A counselor for the health care law speaks with taxi driver David Bilewu, a 39-year-old Nigerian immigrant in Chicago. Illinois set up its exchange through a federal partnership. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Supreme Court Agrees To Hear New Health Law Challenge

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Federal Appeals Court Upholds State Gay Marriage Bans

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How Does Destroying Fish Compare To Shredding Documents, Legally?

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The Supreme Court Takes Up The Case Of The Missing Fish

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Menachem Zivotofsky and his father, Ari Zivotofsky, gather to speak to media outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Monday. The court is taking its second look at a dispute over the wording of U.S. passports for Americans born in Jerusalem, a case with potential foreign policy implications. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Supreme Court Case Tests Status Of Jerusalem

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Ari Zivotofsky (center) walks with then 9-year-old son Menachem, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Nov. 7, 2011. Their case, regarding the desire to have their son's U.S. passport list his place of birth as Israel, returns to the Supreme Court this Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court To Consider Case On Passports Of Jerusalem-Born Citizens

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Robert Schumann wrote his Violin Concerto in 1853. Josef Kriehuber/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Josef Kriehuber/Wikimedia Commons

A Violin Concerto Back From Beyond The Grave

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Can Authorities Cut Off Utilities And Pose As Repairmen To Search A Home?

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In her revised dissent, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg clarified that photo ID cards issued by the Veterans' Affairs are "an acceptable form of photo identification for voting in Texas." Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Supreme Court Hears Arguments In Teeth Whitening Case

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