Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.

The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

The Planned Parenthood women's health organization has come under fire from Republicans after an undercover video allegedly showed a Planned Parenthood executive discussing selling cells from aborted fetuses. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Supreme Court Agrees To Hear Texas Abortion Law Case

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Sila Luis, the owner of Miami home health care companies, was indicted on Medicare fraud charges. She wants to use some of her assets to hire a lawyer for her trial. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Supreme Court Weighs Whether The Government Can Freeze A Defendant's Assets

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Former state and federal prosecutors are urging the Supreme Court to invalidate Timothy Foster's conviction because of "blatant prosecutorial misconduct." They point to study after study showing that when it comes to getting rid of racial discrimination, the current system doesn't work. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Supreme Court Weighs 1987 Conviction By All-White Jury

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Former state and federal prosecutors are urging the Supreme Court to invalidate Foster's conviction because of "blatant prosecutorial misconduct." They point to study after study showing that when it comes to getting rid of racial discrimination, the current system doesn't work. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Supreme Court Takes On Racial Discrimination In Jury Selection

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Ginsburg and Justice Antonin Scalia ride an elephant in India in 1994. Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/Dey Street Books hide caption

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Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/Dey Street Books

Notorious RBG: The Supreme Court Justice Turned Cultural Icon

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People line up outside the Supreme Court Tuesday ahead of arguments in Montgomery v. Louisiana, a case looking at whether a 2012 high court decision regarding mandatory life sentences should apply retroactively. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court Hears Arguments On Resentencing For Juvenile Lifers

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Will Supreme Court Allow Juvenile Life Sentence Ruling To Be Retroactive?

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A gurney in Huntsville, Texas, where prisoners are executed. The death penalty was at the Supreme Court again Wednesday. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Death Penalty Back At The Supreme Court In New Term

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People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in March. There is a public line and a separate line reserved for members of the Supreme Court bar. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Supreme Court To Lawyers: Hold Your Own Place In Line

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