Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that the Kansas Supreme Court should not have overturned the conviction and death sentence of a Kansas man. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters/Landov

John Dennis Apel speaks outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday, after oral arguments in his case. The justices are considering whether Apel has the right to protest at a military base. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg sued Northwest Airlines for what he says was unfair termination from its frequent-flier program. His case goes goes before the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A Supreme Court Fight For The Rights Of (Frequent) Fliers

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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to take another case involving the Affordable Care Act, this time a challenge to the provision that for-profit companies that provide health insurance must include contraceptive coverage in their plans offered to employees. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Takes Challenge To Obamacare Contraceptive Rule

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On June 4, President Obama announces the nominations (from left) of Robert Wilkins, Cornelia Pillard and Patricia Ann Millet to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In the past three weeks, Senate Republicans have blocked confirmation votes on all three. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Supreme Court Questions Labor-Management 'Neutrality' Pacts

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The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday heard oral arguments in a case exploring prayer at government functions. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Supreme Court invokes "God" before every public session. Now the justices will weigh whether it is different, as a legal matter, for government meetings to include more explicitly sectarian prayers. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court Case Puts Public Prayer Back In The Spotlight

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The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in a case that challenges the court's most famous treaty decision, written in 1920 by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Solicitor General Donald Verrilli made a case before the Supreme Court last October based on information that he has discovered to be incorrect. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP