Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Abigail Fisher, seen outside the Supreme Court Wednesday, is a white applicant to the University of Texas who claims she was not admitted because of her race. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Heated Arguments Fly At Supreme Court Over Race In College Admissions

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Abigail Noel Fisher, who challenged a racial component to University of Texas at Austin's admissions policy, speaks to the media outside the U.S. Supreme Court building during arguments in the case in October of 2013. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Affirmative Action Fight Returns To The U.S. Supreme Court

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Activists hold signs during a news conference in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Hears Arguments Testing 'One Person, One Vote'

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Two Texas voters are challenging the 2010 Texas reapportionment as unconstitutional. They say the correct constitutional metric should be eligible voters, not total population. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

When Drawing Districts, Should States Count Each Person Or Each Voter?

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As Supreme Court Upholds Death Penalty, Number Of Executions Plummets

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Chicago suburb Highland Park banned the possession of what it called assault weapons, including AR-15s, like this one, and AK-47s, as well as large capacity magazines. Gun rights advocates challenged the ban, contending that it violated the Second Amendment's guarantee of a right to bear arms. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A gurney in Huntsville, Texas, where death row inmates are strapped down to receive a lethal dose of drugs. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Why Has The Death Penalty Grown Increasingly Rare?

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The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

The Planned Parenthood women's health organization has come under fire from Republicans after an undercover video allegedly showed a Planned Parenthood executive discussing selling cells from aborted fetuses. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Agrees To Hear Texas Abortion Law Case

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Sila Luis, the owner of Miami home health care companies, was indicted on Medicare fraud charges. She wants to use some of her assets to hire a lawyer for her trial. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Supreme Court Weighs Whether The Government Can Freeze A Defendant's Assets

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Former state and federal prosecutors are urging the Supreme Court to invalidate Timothy Foster's conviction because of "blatant prosecutorial misconduct." They point to study after study showing that when it comes to getting rid of racial discrimination, the current system doesn't work. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Supreme Court Weighs 1987 Conviction By All-White Jury

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