Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Nina Totenberg

The Supreme Court, pictured on election night. Republican President-elect Donald Trump now stands to reshape the court in his image, potentially for a generation. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

From Delay To Action: The Supreme Court To Take A Conservative Turn In 2017

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For Supreme Court, 2016 Had More Question Marks Than Certainty

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A banner for State Farm insurance in in D`Iberville, Miss., tells property owners the number to call after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that considers the influences of race and politics in redistricting on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Considers Race, Politics And Redistricting In 2 Cases

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear cases on whether lawmakers in Virginia and North Carolina weighed race too heavily when redrawing congressional districts. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Questions Of Race And Redistricting Return To The Supreme Court

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday about whether immigrants can be detained indefinitely without a chance to persuade a neutral judge that they are entitled to temporary release. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Supreme Court Tests Whether Detained Immigrants Have Right To Hearing

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People attend an immigration rally outside the Supreme Court in June. Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Consider How Long Immigrants May Be Detained Without Bond Hearing

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Supreme Court Tests Role Of Intellectual Disability In Death Penalty Case

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Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Texas Death Case Tests Standards For Defining Intellectual Disability

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Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama talks to the media at Trump Tower in New York Thursday. Sessions was picked to be President-elect Donald Trump's attorney general Friday. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Trump's Election Raises Host Of Issues For Supreme Court

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Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, left, walks with Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., in March at the Capitol in Washington. Schumer is expected to become the new Senate minority leader, but with Donald Trump's election as president, Garland's nomination is done. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Republicans' Senate Tactics Leave Trump Wide Sway Over Nation's Courts

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As President, Trump Will Likely Nominate Supreme Court Justices

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Demonstrators in Philadelphia in 2008 try to draw attention to the subprime mortgage crisis. Philadelphia is one of the cities backing Miami's efforts to sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Supreme Court Revisits 2008's Housing Collapse With Banking Test Cases

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Former Attorney General Janet Reno in 2004. Charlie Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charlie Dharapak/AP

Janet Reno, First Female U.S. Attorney General, Dies At 78

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