Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Anti-abortion rights activists demonstrate at the Supreme Court in Washington on Oct. 5. The court's new conservative supermajority puts the fate of Roe v. Wade in doubt. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court's New Supermajority: What It Means For Roe v. Wade

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Election cases are among those before the U.S. Supreme Court, though none that will change President Trump's defeat. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Religion, Abortion, Guns And Race. Just The Start Of A New Supreme Court Menu

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LEAP fellows Astrid Saenz, Fatima Salcido, and Victor Briseno participating in a law school application workshop. Carrie Sommer/Courtesy of Cindy Lopez hide caption

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Carrie Sommer/Courtesy of Cindy Lopez

Supreme Court Dodges Trump's Plan To Exclude Undocumented Immigrants From Census

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Protesters carrying signs about the census gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. Immigrant rights advocates have vowed to continue fighting President Trump's proposal. Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Supreme Court Punts Census Case, Giving Trump An Iffy Chance To Alter Numbers

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Supreme Court To Hear Case Over NCAA's Limits On Compensation For Student Athletes

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Supreme Court Rejects Texas' Lawsuit Over Election Results

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Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, seen here with President Trump in June in Dallas, sued four states that Joe Biden carried in the general election, claiming their changes to election procedures during the pandemic violated federal law. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court Shuts Door On Texas Suit Seeking To Overturn Election

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Alex Brandon/AP

Supreme Court Says Muslim Men Can Sue FBI Agents In No-Fly List Case

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Saemy Rosenberg and his wife, Lisellotte, are seen with an unnamed man. Saemy Rosenberg was forced to sell his priceless art collection to the Nazis. Now, his grandson wants the Supreme Court to intervene. Courtesy of Jed Leiber hide caption

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Courtesy of Jed Leiber

Looted Nazi Art Again Before Supreme Court

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Supreme Court justices heard arguments in a case that asked whether the court's previous decision to bar non-unanimous jury convictions in criminal trials can be applied retroactively. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Weighs Whether All Non-Unanimous Jury Verdicts Are Unconstitutional

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Justices Doubt Trump Plan To Exclude Some Immigrants From Census

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