Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Nina Totenberg

Obama Administration To File Brief Urging Supreme Court To Strike Down Prop. 8

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The Supreme Court on Wednesday weighs the future of a key provision of the landmark Voting Rights Act. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Supreme Court Police officers stand on the steps in front of the court building in November. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case about the collection of DNA evidence, and whether the Fourth Amendment prohibits police from obtaining DNA samples before conviction without a warrant. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Lyndon Johnson and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. discuss the Voting Rights Act in 1965. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments on whether a key part of the law is still needed nearly a half century after its passage. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A Miami-Dade narcotics detector canine gives a demonstration in 2011. The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that courts should generally consider a drug dog's sniff as reliable if the dog has passed a certified training program that includes controlled performance tests. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

High Court Rules On Detaining Suspects, Sniffer Dogs

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The U.S. Supreme Court J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

People wait in line to enter the Supreme Court as the term began in October. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Barack Obama takes the oath of office beside his wife Michelle and daughters Sasha, right, and Malia, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 20, 2009. Chuck Kennedy/AP hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/AP

Obama's First Oath Of Office Remembered As Less Than Smooth

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Fane Lozman's floating home is docked at a marina in Riviera Beach, Fla., in this undated photo from court documents. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov