Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Fisherman In Missing Fish Case

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Want to get your teeth whitened? You may soon have more options. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that a state board of dentistry unfairly drove competitors out of business by trying to block non-dentists from providing whitening services. Vince Bucci/Getty Images hide caption

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Samantha Elauf outside the Supreme Court Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

High Court Leans Toward Religious Protection In Headscarf Case

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At Supreme Court, Fashion Collides With Religion In Headscarf Case

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U.S. Supreme Court police stand on the plaza in front of the courthouse in January. The court heard arguments Monday about whether an American had a right to know why their foreign-national spouse had been refused entry into the country. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Considers Visa Case For Foreign Spouses

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Justices Ginsburg And Scalia: A Perfect Match Except For Their Views On The Law

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The Rev. Charles Perry of Unity Church, in Birmingham, Ala., marries Curtis Stephens, center, and his partner of 30 years, Pat Helms, Monday at the Jefferson County Courthouse. Alabama began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the marriages in the state. Hal Yeager/AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/AP

Supreme Court Won't Stop Gay Marriages In Alabama

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Supreme Court Refuses To Let Alabama Bar Same-Sex Marriages

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A demonstrator rallies outside the U.S. Chamber of Commerce against the Supreme Court's decision in favor of Citizens United five years ago. Eight protesters at the Supreme Court were arrested and charged. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former air marshal Robert MacLean blew the whistle after he was informed that missions on overnight, long-distance flights were being canceled. The announcement came just days after air marshals were warned of terrorist threats. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Air Marshal Whistleblower

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Supreme Court Rules On 2 Prisoner Rights Cases

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Thirty-nine states elect some or all of their judges, and 30 of them bar personal solicitations in order to preserve judicial impartiality. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Supreme Court Examines Gray Area In Judicial Campaigning

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