Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Examines Strict Laws For Inside Polling Places

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Currently, polling places are largely a politics-free zone, but the Supreme Court heard arguments that could change that. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Should Polling Places Remain Politics-Free? Justices Incredulous At Both Sides

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Immigrants suspected of being in the U.S. illegally are transferred to be processed at the Tucson sector of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection headquarters in Arizona in 2016. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Fane Lozman will make his second appearance before the Supreme Court. This time he has sued the city of Riviera Beach for his arrest at a City Council meeting where he refused to stop talking about government corruption. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

The Curious Case Of A Florida Man Who Called Politicians Corrupt, Got Thrown In Jail

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An unidentified man walks in front of the Microsoft logo at an event in New Delhi. Microsoft is at the center of a Supreme Court case on whether it has to turn over emails stored overseas. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Court Seems Unconvinced Of Microsoft's Argument To Shield Email Data Stored Overseas

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Members of the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees union, or AFSCME, listen to a council executive speak about conditions at state prisons and detention centers in Illinois. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Supreme Court Hears Fiery Arguments In Case That Could Gut Public Sector Unions

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Supreme Court Decision Could Further Undermine Shrinking Union Movement

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The U.S. Supreme Court is shown on Dec. 4, 2017, in Washington, D.C. The court, continuing a years-long pattern, has declined to hear a constitutional challenge to a state gun law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Pennsylvania Has 10 Days To Redraw Congressional Maps

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At the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, NPR's Nina Totenberg talks to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. On stage with them is Robert Redford, founder of the festival. John Nowak / CNN Films hide caption

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John Nowak / CNN Films

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

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The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case where a defense lawyer refused to follow the instructions of his client, who contended he was innocent. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

In Supreme Court, Skepticism Of Lawyer Who Overrode Client's Wish To Plead Not Guilty

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Supreme Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use-It Or Lose-It' Voter Registration Rule

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Voters cast their ballots in Salem, Ohio, on Nov. 8, 2016. On Wednesday the Supreme Court hears a case about Ohio's voter registration policy. Ty Wright/Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Getty Images

In Key Voting-Rights Case, Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use It Or Lose It' Rule

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Los Angeles Police inspect a vehicle parked in the same neighborhood as a crime scene in 2012. The Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday regarding when police can search a vehicle without a warrant. Jason Redmond/AP hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AP