Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let 40-Foot Cross Stand On Public Land

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The Peace Cross in Maryland is a memorial to veterans from World War I. Becky Harlan /NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan /NPR

Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let Cross Stand But Struggles With Church-State Test

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A World War I memorial cross sits in Bladensburg, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. The federal government asked the Supreme Court to rule in favor of the cross, which critics say is an unconstitutional state religious endorsement. Arguments are scheduled to be heard this week. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Crews remove early morning snow during a winter storm at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. It's not unusual for the high court to be open when the rest of Washington is closed. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Limits Civil Asset Forfeiture, Rules Excessive Fines Apply To States

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Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

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A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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Trump's National Emergency Declaration Is Likely To Face Constitutionality Challenges

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Supreme Court To Take On Gun Laws This Spring

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Supreme Court Hears Case Over Total Wine's Desire To Expand Into Tennessee

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