Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh had some sharp questions about partisan gerrymandering, as the court heard arguments on it Tuesday. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Seems Conflicted On Partisan Gerrymandering At Supreme Court Arguments

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Demonstrators protest partisan redistricting in 2017 during oral arguments in a case out of Wisconsin. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Takes Another Look At Partisan Redistricting

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Chief Justice John Roberts attends the 37th Kennedy Center Honors at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 7, 2014, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

In 'The Chief,' An Enigmatic, Conservative John Roberts Walks A Political Tightrope

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People line up to enter the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

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For those familiar with Justice Neil Gorsuch's record, his vote was not a surprise. He previously served on the federal appeals court based in Denver, a court that encompasses dozens of recognized Indian tribes. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to Sandra Day O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary. Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

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Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let 40-Foot Cross Stand On Public Land

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The Peace Cross in Maryland is a memorial to veterans from World War I. Becky Harlan /NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan /NPR

Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let Cross Stand But Struggles With Church-State Test

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A World War I memorial cross sits in Bladensburg, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. The federal government asked the Supreme Court to rule in favor of the cross, which critics say is an unconstitutional state religious endorsement. Arguments are scheduled to be heard this week. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Crews remove early morning snow during a winter storm at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. It's not unusual for the high court to be open when the rest of Washington is closed. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Limits Civil Asset Forfeiture, Rules Excessive Fines Apply To States

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Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

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A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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