Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Supreme Court Appears To Favor Allowing Census Citizenship Question

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Supreme Court To Hear Controversial Census Citizenship Question

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The Supreme Court justices are hearing oral arguments Tuesday over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to forms for the 2020 census. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

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Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company "FUCT," leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Dances Around The F-Word With Real Potential Financial Consequences

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Without Using Profanity, Supreme Court Justices Discuss Case Centered On Bad Language

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Death penalty opponent Herve Deschamps holds a sign during a vigil outside St. Francis Xavier College Church in St. Louis, hours before the 2014 scheduled execution of death row inmate Russell Bucklew. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh had some sharp questions about partisan gerrymandering, as the court heard arguments on it Tuesday. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Seems Conflicted On Partisan Gerrymandering At Supreme Court Arguments

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Demonstrators protest partisan redistricting in 2017 during oral arguments in a case out of Wisconsin. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Takes Another Look At Partisan Redistricting

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Chief Justice John Roberts attends the 37th Kennedy Center Honors at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 7, 2014, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

In 'The Chief,' An Enigmatic, Conservative John Roberts Walks A Political Tightrope

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People line up to enter the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

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For those familiar with Justice Neil Gorsuch's record, his vote was not a surprise. He previously served on the federal appeals court based in Denver, a court that encompasses dozens of recognized Indian tribes. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to Sandra Day O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary. Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

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Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let 40-Foot Cross Stand On Public Land

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