Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Nina Totenberg

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg revealed Friday that she began undergoing chemotherapy in May for a new cancer diagnosis. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for DVF hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for DVF

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Has Cancer Again, Says She Will Remain On The Court

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Pamela Talkin, seen here in October 1991, retired last week as the Supreme Court's first female marshal. Also retiring is Christine Luchok Fallon, the first woman to hold the position of reporter of decisions. John Duricka/AP hide caption

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John Duricka/AP

First Women To Hold Top Staff Jobs At Supreme Court Are Retiring

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Bullhorns are seen during a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court on June 29. The court had a momentous term with cases ranging from President Trump's financial records to immigration and abortion. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

A Powerful Chief And Unexpected Splits: 6 Takeaways From The Supreme Court Term

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Key Takeaways From Supreme Court Term

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Chief Justice John Roberts, here at the State of the Union address in February, has concluded a momentous term with the Supreme Court. Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images

Chief Justice John Roberts Rebuked Trump This Term. What's He Up To?

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The president swiftly responded to the Supreme Court rulings on Twitter saying the legal battle, which has not been put to rest, is "not fair to this Presidency or Administration!" J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Says Trump Not 'Immune' From Records Release, But Hedges On House Case

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Supreme Court Upholds Challenges To Access To Birth Control

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Wednesday's decision seems to be an extension of a 2012 ruling in which the Supreme Court unanimously found that a fourth-grade teacher at a Lutheran school who was commissioned as a minister could not sue over her firing. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justices Rule Teachers At Religious Schools Aren't Protected By Fair Employment Laws

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Supreme Court Upholds State 'Faithless Elector' Laws

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The Supreme Court decides that Electoral College delegates have "no ground for reversing" the statewide popular vote. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Rules State 'Faithless Elector' Laws Constitutional

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