Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
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Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife, Virginia, listen as he is introduced prior to speaking at the Federalist Society in Washington on Nov. 15, 2007. The Thomases drew criticism for Virginia's role as co-founder, president and CEO of Liberty Central, a political group that advertises itself as linked to the Tea Party movement. She later stepped down. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Bill Puts Ethics Spotlight On Supreme Court Justices

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Appeals Court Rejects Part Of Health Care Law

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California has lost its argument that the government should protect children from the effects of violent video games. The Supreme Court says the First Amendment protects their sale. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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High Court OKs Sales Of Violent Video Games To Kids

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Supreme Court Overturns Calif. Video Game Law

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