Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case where a defense lawyer refused to follow the instructions of his client, who contended he was innocent. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

In Supreme Court, Skepticism Of Lawyer Who Overrode Client's Wish To Plead Not Guilty

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Supreme Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use-It Or Lose-It' Voter Registration Rule

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Voters cast their ballots in Salem, Ohio, on Nov. 8, 2016. On Wednesday the Supreme Court hears a case about Ohio's voter registration policy. Ty Wright/Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Getty Images

In Key Voting-Rights Case, Court Appears Divided Over Ohio's 'Use It Or Lose It' Rule

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Los Angeles Police inspect a vehicle parked in the same neighborhood as a crime scene in 2012. The Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday regarding when police can search a vehicle without a warrant. Jason Redmond/AP hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AP

In 1968, Mary Beth Tinker and her brother, John, display two black armbands they used to protest the Vietnam War at school. Bettmann Archive via Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive via Getty Images

Students Identify With 50-Year-Old Supreme Court Case

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Then-Federal Election Commissioner Matthew Petersen testifies during a hearing before the Elections Subcommittee of House Committee on House Administration on November 3, 2011, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

3 Trump Judicial Nominees Withdraw, Raising Some Questions About Vetting

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Judge Alex Kozinski of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has been accused of sexual harassment. An inquiry into the allegations has been transferred to the 2nd Circuit. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Demonstrators gather outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday as the justices heard arguments in a case about a Colorado baker who refused to create a cake for a same-sex wedding, citing moral objection. Sam Gringlas/NPR hide caption

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Sam Gringlas/NPR

Supreme Court Seems Split In Case Of Baker Vs. Same-Sex Couple; Eyes Now On Kennedy

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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie answers questions about a sports gambling case after Supreme Court arguments on Monday. Emily Kan/NPR hide caption

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Emily Kan/NPR

Odds Drop On Sports-Betting Ban As Supreme Court Hears New Jersey Case

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Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo., is one of the bakers who does not want to bake wedding cakes for same-sex couples, saying it violates his religious beliefs. Matthew Staver/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Staver/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A Supreme Court Clash Between Artistry And The Rights Of Gay Couples

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New York Knicks player Bill Bradley is shown in New York City in Oct. 1970. AP hide caption

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AP

New Jersey Takes On Major Professional Sports Leagues In Sports Betting Case

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Supreme Court Hears Case On Cellphone Location Information

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Supreme Court Considers Cellphones And Digital Privacy

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The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday. At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers. Georgijevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Georgijevic/Getty Images