Nina Totenberg Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent.
Nina Totenberg
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Nina Totenberg

Asa Mathat
Nina Totenberg
Asa Mathat

Nina Totenberg

Correspondent, Legal Affairs

Nina Totenberg is NPR's award-winning legal affairs correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR's critically acclaimed newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.

Totenberg's coverage of the Supreme Court and legal affairs has won her widespread recognition. Newsweek says, "The mainstays [of NPR] are Morning Edition and All Things Considered. But the creme de la creme is Nina Totenberg."

In 1991, her ground-breaking report about University of Oklahoma Law Professor Anita Hill's allegations of sexual harassment by Judge Clarence Thomas led the Senate Judiciary Committee to re-open Thomas's Supreme Court confirmation hearings to consider Hill's charges. NPR received the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for its gavel-to-gavel coverage — anchored by Totenberg — of both the original hearings and the inquiry into Anita Hill's allegations, and for Totenberg's reports and exclusive interview with Hill.

That same coverage earned Totenberg additional awards, among them: the Long Island University George Polk Award for excellence in journalism; the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting; the Carr Van Anda Award from the Scripps School of Journalism; and the prestigious Joan S. Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based national affairs/public policy reporting, which also acknowledged her coverage of Justice Thurgood Marshall's retirement.

Totenberg was named Broadcaster of the Year and honored with the 1998 Sol Taishoff Award for Excellence in Broadcasting from the National Press Foundation. She is the first radio journalist to receive the award. She is also the recipient of the American Judicature Society's first-ever award honoring a career body of work in the field of journalism and the law. In 1988, Totenberg won the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for her coverage of Supreme Court nominations. The jurors of the award stated, "Ms. Totenberg broke the story of Judge (Douglas) Ginsburg's use of marijuana, raising issues of changing social values and credibility with careful perspective under deadline pressure."

Totenberg has been honored seven times by the American Bar Association for continued excellence in legal reporting and has received a number of honorary degrees. On a lighter note, in 1992 and 1988 Esquire magazine named her one of the "Women We Love".

A frequent contributor to major newspapers and periodicals, she has published articles in The New York Times Magazine, The Harvard Law Review, The Christian Science Monitor, Parade Magazine, New York Magazine, and others.

Before joining NPR in 1975, Totenberg served as Washington editor of New Times Magazine, and before that she was the legal affairs correspondent for the National Observer.

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Chief Justice John Roberts attends the 37th Kennedy Center Honors at the Kennedy Center on Dec. 7, 2014, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

In 'The Chief,' An Enigmatic, Conservative John Roberts Walks A Political Tightrope

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People line up to enter the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Justices Seem Incredulous At Repeated Racial Bias In Jury Selection

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For those familiar with Justice Neil Gorsuch's record, his vote was not a surprise. He previously served on the federal appeals court based in Denver, a court that encompasses dozens of recognized Indian tribes. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to Sandra Day O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary. Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

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Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let 40-Foot Cross Stand On Public Land

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The Peace Cross in Maryland is a memorial to veterans from World War I. Becky Harlan /NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan /NPR

Supreme Court Appears Ready To Let Cross Stand But Struggles With Church-State Test

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A World War I memorial cross sits in Bladensburg, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. The federal government asked the Supreme Court to rule in favor of the cross, which critics say is an unconstitutional state religious endorsement. Arguments are scheduled to be heard this week. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Crews remove early morning snow during a winter storm at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. It's not unusual for the high court to be open when the rest of Washington is closed. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

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Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Limits Civil Asset Forfeiture, Rules Excessive Fines Apply To States

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Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

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A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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Trump's National Emergency Declaration Is Likely To Face Constitutionality Challenges

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