Eric Westervelt Eric Westervelt is a San Francisco-based correspondent for NPR's National Desk.
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Eric Westervelt

Germans Worry What's Behind Wave Of Arsons

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UK Stunned By Rioters' Racial, Economic Diversity

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Police forensic officers work at the scene where three people were killed after being struck by a vehicle Wednesday in the Winson Green area of Birmingham, England. Jeff J Mitchell/Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

While London Calms Down, Riots Spread Across UK

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Germany Looks To Replace Nuclear Power

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A piece of street art known as "Tantawi's underwear" mocks Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, who heads the ruling transitional military council.   hide caption

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Egyptians who fled fighting in Libya carry their belongings at the Egyptian-Libyan border in Salloum, Egypt. The International Organization for Migration estimates that more than 105,000 Egyptians have returned from Libya. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

Egyptian Workers Who Fled Libya Struggle At Home

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Protesters in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, demand the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh on June 17. Some Yemen watchers argue that current U.S. policy in the country may create sympathy with al-Qaida where none existed before. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

A man holds a placard protesting military trials at a demonstration in front of a building where the high military council met with youth groups on June 1. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

In Europe, Refugee Influx Puts Borders In Spotlight

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