John Ydstie After covering the economy, Wall Street and federal budget issues for two decades, John Ydstie is now applying his reporting and interviewing skills as a roving national correspondent.
Doby Photography/NPR
John Ydstie 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

John Ydstie

Correspondent/Host

John Ydstie has covered the economy, Wall Street and the federal budget for NPR for two decades. In recent years NPR has broadened his responsibilities, making use of his reporting and interviewing skills to cover major stories like the aftermath of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina and the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal. His current focus is reporting on the global financial crisis. Ydstie is also a regular guest host on the NPR news programs Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During 1991 and 1992 Ydstie was NPR's bureau chief in London. He traveled throughout Europe covering, among other things, the breakup of the Soviet Union and attempts to move Europe toward closer political and economic union. He accompanied U.S. businessmen exploring investment opportunities in Russia as the Soviet Union was crumbling. He was on the scene in The Netherlands when European leaders approved the Maastricht Treaty, which created the European Union.

In August 1990, Ydstie traveled to Saudi Arabia for NPR as a member of the Pentagon press pool sent to cover the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. During the early stages of the crisis, Ydstie was the only American radio reporter in the country.

Ydstie has been with NPR since 1979. For two years, he was an associate producer responsible for Midwest coverage. In 1982 he became senior editor on NPR's Washington Desk, overseeing coverage of the federal government, American politics and economics. In 1984, Ydstie joined Morning Edition as the show's senior editor, and later was promoted to the position of executive producer. In 1988, he became NPR's economics correspondent.

During his tenure with NPR, Ydstie has won numerous awards. He was a member of the NPR team that received the George Foster Peabody for its coverage of 9/11. Ydstie's reporting from Saudi Arabia helped NPR win the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in 1991 for coverage of the Gulf War. Prior to joining NPR, Ydstie was a reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio. While there, he was awarded the Clarion Award for his report "Vietnam Experience and America Today."

A graduate of Concordia College, in Moorhead, MN, Ydstie earned a bachelor of arts degree, summa cum laude, with a major in English literature and a minor in speech communications.

Ydstie was born in Minneapolis, and grew up in rural North Dakota.

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross Defends U.S. Trade Policies

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News Brief: Republicans Talk Immigration Overhaul, China Tariffs Latest

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Global Markets Fall As U.S.-China Trade Tensions Rise

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks before the Economic Club of Chicago on April 6. The central bank raised a key short-term rate by a quarter-point on Wednesday, the second increase this year. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Trade Tensions And Threat Of Tariffs Has Led To Lots Of Uncertainty

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Mary Buchzeiger, CEO of Lucerne International, says President Trump's proposed tariffs on imports could destroy her Michigan-based company, which supplies automakers with parts mostly made in China. This week, she presented her case for an exemption from the tariffs at the International Trade Commission building in Washington, D.C. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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Small Business Owner Fears U.S.-China Trade War Will Destroy Her Company

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U.S. Unemployment Dips Below 4 Percent For The First Time In More Than 17 Years

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Trader Edward Curran (right) works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. As Treasury yields topped 3 percent on Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average tumbled. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Steelworkers leave a plant at the end of their shift in Bethlehem, Pa., in 1947. Employment in the industry has declined by 80 percent from its peak six decades ago, according to author Douglas Irwin. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Protection For The Steel Industry Is As Old As America

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As Threats Of Additional Tariffs Continue, China Says U.S. Demands Are Unreasonable

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China Imposes Tariffs On Long List Of U.S. Produced Goods

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A shopper makes a purchase at the J.C. Penney store in North Riverside, Ill., Nov. 17. U.S. consumer spending grew in the fourth quarter at its fastest pace in three years. Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters hide caption

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Talks Ease Concerns Over Potential Trade War With China

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Trade War Could Damage U.S. Consumers More Than China

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