John Ydstie John Ydstie has covered the economy, Wall Street and the Federal Reserve for NPR for nearly three decades.
John Ydstie 2010
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John Ydstie

Experts estimate that in a 2 percent growth economy, the average household income would increase $17,000 less over a decade than it would in a world of 3 percent growth. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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What The 'New Normal' Means For Americans

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Specialists Evan Solomon works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday, when major stock indexes fell steeply. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

New Data Point To No Quick Fix For Economy

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Bernanke Expects Jobs Market To Strengthen

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The Federal Reserve on Wednesday will kick off a series of regular press conferences, to be held four times a year. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Taking Questions: A New Move For Fed Transparency

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President Obama outlined a mix of spending cuts and tax hikes to reduce the deficit Wednesday at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Japan's Fishing Industry Crushed By Tsunami

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Advertising boards on buildings are seen without illumination at Tokyo's Shibuya district. Rolling blackouts are crippling a number of industries. Miho Takahashi/AP hide caption

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Miho Takahashi/AP

A worker assembles a Nissan Leaf electric vehicle at the company's Oppama plant in Yokosuka, Japan. Auto plants are reopening, but getting parts remains a challenge. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

People line up to buy tickets for the earliest possible flight Friday at Narita International Airport. Koki Nagahama/Getty Images hide caption

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Koki Nagahama/Getty Images