John Ydstie After covering the economy, Wall Street and federal budget issues for two decades, John Ydstie is now applying his reporting and interviewing skills as a roving national correspondent.
Doby Photography/NPR
John Ydstie 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

John Ydstie

Correspondent/Host

John Ydstie has covered the economy, Wall Street and the federal budget for NPR for two decades. In recent years NPR has broadened his responsibilities, making use of his reporting and interviewing skills to cover major stories like the aftermath of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina and the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal. His current focus is reporting on the global financial crisis. Ydstie is also a regular guest host on the NPR news programs Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During 1991 and 1992 Ydstie was NPR's bureau chief in London. He traveled throughout Europe covering, among other things, the breakup of the Soviet Union and attempts to move Europe toward closer political and economic union. He accompanied U.S. businessmen exploring investment opportunities in Russia as the Soviet Union was crumbling. He was on the scene in The Netherlands when European leaders approved the Maastricht Treaty, which created the European Union.

In August 1990, Ydstie traveled to Saudi Arabia for NPR as a member of the Pentagon press pool sent to cover the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. During the early stages of the crisis, Ydstie was the only American radio reporter in the country.

Ydstie has been with NPR since 1979. For two years, he was an associate producer responsible for Midwest coverage. In 1982 he became senior editor on NPR's Washington Desk, overseeing coverage of the federal government, American politics and economics. In 1984, Ydstie joined Morning Edition as the show's senior editor, and later was promoted to the position of executive producer. In 1988, he became NPR's economics correspondent.

During his tenure with NPR, Ydstie has won numerous awards. He was a member of the NPR team that received the George Foster Peabody for its coverage of 9/11. Ydstie's reporting from Saudi Arabia helped NPR win the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award in 1991 for coverage of the Gulf War. Prior to joining NPR, Ydstie was a reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio. While there, he was awarded the Clarion Award for his report "Vietnam Experience and America Today."

A graduate of Concordia College, in Moorhead, MN, Ydstie earned a bachelor of arts degree, summa cum laude, with a major in English literature and a minor in speech communications.

Ydstie was born in Minneapolis, and grew up in rural North Dakota.

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BlackRock CEO Says Companies Need To Do More Than Deliver Profits

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How Trump's Corporate Tax Cut Is Playing Out For Wal-Mart

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Wal-Mart Says It Will Boost Wages, Give Bonuses With New Savings From Tax Law

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Professors Suggest 'Baby Bonds' Could Fix Widening Inequality In The U.S.

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Rainer Stutzel of Beko Technologies stands beside a catalytic converter that cleans compressed air systems. The company exports its products around the world. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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Germany's Export Machine Draws Both Envy And Ire

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Apprentice industrial clerk Henrik Tillmann assembles a valve for a commercial aircraft galley kitchen at Hebmuller Aerospace near Dusseldorf, Germany. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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Robust Apprenticeship Program Key To Germany's Manufacturing Might

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Yvonne Schmittenberg holds a tray of weld nuts produced by Schmittenberg Metal Works. They're used in the automotive industry. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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How Germany Wins At Manufacturing — For Now

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Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, who will step down in February, has said she thinks the forces that have been holding inflation down are temporary and that she expects it will soon be on the rise again. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Fed Raises Interest Rates Again As Economy Rolls On

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Jerome Powell, nominated to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, testifies Tuesday during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking Committee. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's Pick For Fed Signals Interest Rate Hike Likely Next Month

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Study Finds Republican Tax Bills Directly Benefit Businesses, Not The Middle Class

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Fed Chair Janet Yellen on Monday submitted her resignation from the Federal Reserve Board. Earlier this month, President Trump named Jerome Powell to be the next Fed chair. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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House Lawmakers Scheduled To Vote Thursday On Tax Overhaul

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Republicans in the House and Senate have come up with different proposals to overhaul the U.S. tax code, but both bills would add $1.5 trillion to the national debt. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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GOP Tax Cuts Expected To Push Up Nation's Debt

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Jerome Powell was nominated to the Federal Reserve Board by former President Barack Obama in 2012. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Picks Federal Reserve Insider Jerome Powell To Be Its Chairman

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