Geoff Nunberg Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.
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Geoff Nunberg

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Opinion: Why The Term 'Deep State' Speaks To Conspiracy Theorists

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Opinion: U.S. And U.K. Remain United, Not Divided, By Their Common Language

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So Longhand: Has Cursive Reached The End Of The Line?

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"However people map out the geography of American political tribes, they always exempt themselves and their neighbors," Geoff Nunberg says. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

As Fissures Between Political Camps Grow, 'Tribalism' Emerges As The Word Of 2017

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An art exhibit at the de Young Museum in San Francisco celebrates 50 years since the famed Summer of Love. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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50 Years After The Summer Of Love, Hippie Counterculture Is Relegated To Kitsch

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An 1894 engraving depicts chapter 18 of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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The Enduring Legacy Of Jane Austen's 'Truth Universally Acknowledged'

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After Years Of Restraint, A Linguist Says 'Yes!' To The Exclamation Point

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg says that people often use spurious quotations to create a version of Abraham Lincoln that suit a political purpose. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Lincoln Said What? Bogus Quotations Take On A New Life On Social Media

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'Normal': The Word Of The Year (In A Year That Was Anything But)

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg argues that the media's decision to bleep or otherwise block out a particular word can result in concealing information the public needs to know. dane_mark/Getty Images hide caption

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Not Fit To Print? When Politicians Talk Dirty, Media Scramble To Sanitize

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The media have used a variety of epithets to describe white working-class Trump supporters. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says these terms embody the class contention that is central to this year's election. Dan Bannister/AWL Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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A Resurgence Of 'Redneck' Pride, Marked By Race, Class And Trump

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a town hall meeting in Roanoke, Va. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Is Trump's Call For 'Law And Order' A Coded Racial Message?

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Irked By The Way Millennials Speak? 'I Feel Like' It's Time To Loosen Up

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Is the English spelling system irrational? Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Changes To French Spelling Make Us Wonder: Why Is English So Weird?

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Everyone Uses Singular 'They,' Whether They Realize It Or Not

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