Geoff Nunberg Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Geoff Nunberg

Linguist/Commentator, Fresh Air

Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

He teaches at the School of Information at the University of California at Berkeley and is the author of The Way We Talk Now, Going Nucular, Talking Right and The Years of Talking Dangerously. His most recent book is Ascent of the A-Word. His website is www.geoffreynunberg.com.

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An art exhibit at the de Young Museum in San Francisco celebrates 50 years since the famed Summer of Love. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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50 Years After The Summer Of Love, Hippie Counterculture Is Relegated To Kitsch

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An 1894 engraving depicts chapter 18 of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. De Agostini Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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The Enduring Legacy Of Jane Austen's 'Truth Universally Acknowledged'

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After Years Of Restraint, A Linguist Says 'Yes!' To The Exclamation Point

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg says that people often use spurious quotations to create a version of Abraham Lincoln that suit a political purpose. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lincoln Said What? Bogus Quotations Take On A New Life On Social Media

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'Normal': The Word Of The Year (In A Year That Was Anything But)

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg argues that the media's decision to bleep or otherwise block out a particular word can result in concealing information the public needs to know. dane_mark/Getty Images hide caption

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Not Fit To Print? When Politicians Talk Dirty, Media Scramble To Sanitize

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The media have used a variety of epithets to describe white working-class Trump supporters. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says these terms embody the class contention that is central to this year's election. Dan Bannister/AWL Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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A Resurgence Of 'Redneck' Pride, Marked By Race, Class And Trump

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a town hall meeting in Roanoke, Va. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Is Trump's Call For 'Law And Order' A Coded Racial Message?

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Irked By The Way Millennials Speak? 'I Feel Like' It's Time To Loosen Up

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Is the English spelling system irrational? Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Changes To French Spelling Make Us Wonder: Why Is English So Weird?

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Everyone Uses Singular 'They,' Whether They Realize It Or Not

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg notes that while workers in today's "gig economy" may have more freedom than they had in years past, they also have less security. Hong Li/Getty Images hide caption

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Goodbye Jobs, Hello 'Gigs': How One Word Sums Up A New Economic Reality

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Are people starting sentences with "so" more frequently than ever or are we just noticing it more? Leigh Wells/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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So, What's The Big Deal With Starting A Sentence With 'So'?

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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has promised to "tell it like it is" during his presidential campaign. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Tracing The Origin Of The Campaign Promise To 'Tell It Like It Is'

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