Eric Deggans Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.
Eric Deggans
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Eric Deggans

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Eric Deggans
Carrie Pratt/Simply Blue Studios

Eric Deggans

TV Critic

Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans came to NPR in 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times, where he served a TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than 20 years, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012, by Palgrave Macmillan.

Deggans is also currently a media analyst/contributor for MSNBC and NBC News. In August 2013, he guest hosted CNN's media analysis show Reliable Sources, joining a select group of journalists and media critics filling in for departed host Howard Kurtz. The same month, Deggans was awarded the Florida Press Club's first-ever Diversity award, honoring his coverage of issues involving race and media. He received the Legacy award from the National Association of Black Journalists' A&E Task Force, an honor bestowed to "seasoned A&E journalists who are at the top of their careers." And in 2019, he was named winner of the American Sociological Association's Excellence in the Reporting of Social Justice Issues Award.

In 2019, Deggans served as the first African American chairman of the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

He also has joined a prestigious group of contributors to the first ethics book created in conjunction with the Poynter Institute for Media Studies for journalism's digital age: The New Ethics of Journalism, published in August 2013, by Sage/CQ Press.

From 2004 to 2005, Deggans sat on the then-St. Petersburg Times editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as TV critic for the Times, crafting reviews, news stories and long-range trend pieces on the state of the media industry both locally and nationally. He originally joined the paper as its pop music critic in November 1995. He has worked at the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey and both the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania.

Now serving as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, he has also served on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and on the board of the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists.

Additionally, he worked as a professional drummer in the 1980s, touring and performing with Motown recording artists The Voyage Band throughout the Midwest and in Osaka, Japan. He continues to perform with area bands and recording artists as a drummer, bassist and vocalist.

Deggans earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science and journalism from Indiana University.

Story Archive

2 new shows fall into the smart-dumb TV category

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Review: Welcome back, 'Star Trek'

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Clockwise from top left: Amber Ruffin, Cristela Alonzo, Trevor Noah, Ali Wong, Roy Wood Jr. and Hasan Minhaj could be successors to James Corden on The Late Late Show. Noam Galai and Kevin Winter/Getty Images, Michael Schwartz/CBS, Max S Gerber/Netflix, Rich Polk and Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai and Kevin Winter/Getty Images, Michael Schwartz/CBS, Max S Gerber/Netflix, Rich Polk and Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Sofia Hublitz, Jason Bateman, Skylar Gaertner, and Laura Linney in a scene from Ozark. Tina Rowden/Netflix hide caption

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Tina Rowden/Netflix

'Winning Time' portrays the rise of the L.A. Lakers. Its subjects call it defamatory

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Jason Bateman as Marty Byrde and Laura Linney as Wendy Byrde on the Netflix drama Ozark. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix's 'Ozark' ends as a thrilling, yet disappointing take on a criminal family

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Jon Bernthal plays Baltimore police officer Wayne Jenkins on HBO's We Own This City. Paul Schiraldi/HBO hide caption

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HBO's 'We Own This City' is the closest fans will get to a sequel of 'The Wire'

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Review: The 3rd season of 'Barry' shows a far darker vision of him than seen before

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What the shutdown of CNN+ might indicate about the future of streaming TV

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How Netflix plans to recover after losing 200,000 subscribers

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Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross in the series finale episode of Black-ish, "Homegoing." Richard Cartwright/ABC hide caption

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The legacy of ABC's 'Black-ish': Presenting a Black TV family that isn't a monolith

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Encore: 'First Lady' series is compelling when it dramatizes the unseen moments

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'First Lady' series compels when dramatizing the unseen moments

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Books We Love: Recommendations about life in the United States

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