Eric Deggans Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.
Eric Deggans
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Eric Deggans

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Eric Deggans
Carrie Pratt/Simply Blue Studios

Eric Deggans

TV Critic

Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans came to NPR in 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times, where he served a TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than 20 years, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012, by Palgrave Macmillan.

Deggans is also currently a media analyst/contributor for MSNBC and NBC News. In August 2013, he guest hosted CNN's media analysis show Reliable Sources, joining a select group of journalists and media critics filling in for departed host Howard Kurtz. The same month, Deggans was awarded the Florida Press Club's first-ever Diversity award, honoring his coverage of issues involving race and media. He received the Legacy award from the National Association of Black Journalists' A&E Task Force, an honor bestowed to "seasoned A&E journalists who are at the top of their careers." And in 2019, he was named winner of the American Sociological Association's Excellence in the Reporting of Social Justice Issues Award.

In 2019, Deggans served as the first African American chairman of the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

He also has joined a prestigious group of contributors to the first ethics book created in conjunction with the Poynter Institute for Media Studies for journalism's digital age: The New Ethics of Journalism, published in August 2013, by Sage/CQ Press.

From 2004 to 2005, Deggans sat on the then-St. Petersburg Times editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as TV critic for the Times, crafting reviews, news stories and long-range trend pieces on the state of the media industry both locally and nationally. He originally joined the paper as its pop music critic in November 1995. He has worked at the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey and both the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania.

Now serving as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, he has also served on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and on the board of the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists.

Additionally, he worked as a professional drummer in the 1980s, touring and performing with Motown recording artists The Voyage Band throughout the Midwest and in Osaka, Japan. He continues to perform with area bands and recording artists as a drummer, bassist and vocalist.

Deggans earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science and journalism from Indiana University.

Story Archive

Friday

How 'The Last Of Us' makes an old plot line feel fresh

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Tuesday

The controversy surrounding Andrea Riseborough's Oscar nomination

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Thursday

Jimmy Kimmel during a recent taping of Jimmy Kimmel Live! Randy Holmes/ABC hide caption

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Randy Holmes/ABC

Jimmy Kimmel celebrates 20 years as a (reluctant) late night TV institution

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Wednesday

Why HBO Max's 'Velma' is considered by some to be 'most hated show on TV'

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Monday

Review: 'Last of Us' takes a familiar story to exciting new places

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Wednesday

Ke Huy Quan poses with the Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture award for Everything Everywhere All at Once during the 80th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton on Jan. 10, 2023 in Beverly Hills, Calif. Amy Sussman/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Sussman/Getty Images

Monday

Sunday

Clockwise from upper left: Pedro Pascal in HBO's The Last of Us, Robert Flack from PBS' American Masters: Roberta Flack, Jane Lynch from Starz's Party Down and Harrison Ford in Apple TV 's Shrinking. HBO/PBS/Starz/Apple TV hide caption

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HBO/PBS/Starz/Apple TV

Tuesday

Bashir Salahuddin in South Side. Adrian S. Burrows Sr./HBO Max hide caption

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Adrian S. Burrows Sr./HBO Max

Wednesday

Nothing this year brought home the dangers in private ownership of major social media platforms more than the capricious, often-destructive and regularly unpredictable actions of Twitter CEO Elon Musk. He is pictured above at Tesla's "Gigafactory" in Germany on March 22, 2022. Patrick Pleul/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Pleul/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

Clockwise from top left: The Banshees of Inisherin, Everything Everywhere All at Once, Only Murders in the Building, Nope, This Is Going to Hurt and The Dropout Searchlight Pictures, A24, Hulu, Universal Studios, AMC Networks, Hulu hide caption

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Searchlight Pictures, A24, Hulu, Universal Studios, AMC Networks, Hulu

Saturday

Popular titles are vanishing from HBO Max after merger

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Thursday

The long-awaited sequel to 'Avatar' is more than 3 hours long

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Thursday

LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 27: Prince Harry and actress Meghan Markle during an official photocall to announce their engagement at The Sunken Gardens at Kensington Palace on November 27, 2017 in London, England. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have been a couple officially since November 2016 and are due to marry in Spring 2018. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson/Getty Images) Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson/Getty Images