Peter Overby As NPR's correspondent covering campaign finance and lobbying, Peter Overby totes around a business card that reads Power, Money & Influence Correspondent. Some of his lobbyist sources call it the best job title in Washington.
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Peter Overby

A lawsuit brought by the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia regarding President Trump's profits from the Trump International Hotel near the White House can proceed, a federal judge has ruled. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin testifies during a U.S. House hearing on March 15. Shulkin has been criticized for taking his wife along on a 2017 official trip to Europe. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Why Trump Appointees Refer To 'Optics' When Discussing Spending Scandals

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Some of Cambridge Analytica's claims about its role in Donald Trump's 2016 campaign suggest it may have violated U.S. campaign finance laws. Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images

With examples of Russian-created Facebook pages behind him, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., questions witnesses during a 2017 Senate hearing on Russian-backed ads on social media in the 2016 election. Now, the Federal Election Commission is looking into increasing disclosure requirements for online ads. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Rick Saccone, Republican candidate for Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District, takes questions form reporters last week in Pittsburgh. Saccone has needed millions of dollars in spending from Republican allies to stave off a strong challenge from the Democratic candidate, Conor Lamb. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump administration Cabinet secretaries attend ceremonies for late evangelist Billy Graham at the U.S. Capitol on Feb. 28. At least nine current and former members of the Cabinet face accusations of abusing their office. Aaron Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron Bernstein/Getty Images

Trump's Cabinet Scandals: Is Abuse Of Office Contagious?

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Finding Common Threads In Trump Cabinet Members' 'Unethical Behavior'

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White House counselor Kellyanne Conway participates in an interview with CNN at the White House in May. Conway was reprimanded for mixing partisan politics with her official duties in TV interviews last fall. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Capitol is seen reflected in the windows of the Capitol Visitors Center. As Democrats seek to win the House in this year's midterms, they're relying on an online fundraising platform called ActBlue. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Donald Trump, center, then the Republican presidential nominee, attends the opening of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., in October 2016. After winning the election, Trump did not divest himself of his business holdings or put them in a blind trust. Lawsuits have been filed that allege he is violating anti-corruption provisions in the Constitution. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Resistance To Trump's Presidency Is Helping Groups On The Left Raise Money

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More than a year after President Trump was sworn in, his inaugural committee said in tax filings that it raised nearly $107 million and spent almost all of the money. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Lawyer Says He Paid Former Adult Film Star $130,000 In A Private Transaction

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