Peter Overby As NPR's correspondent covering campaign finance and lobbying, Peter Overby totes around a business card that reads Power, Money & Influence Correspondent. Some of his lobbyist sources call it the best job title in Washington.
Peter Overby 2010
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Peter Overby

Doby Photography/NPR
Peter Overby 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Peter Overby

Power, Money and Influence Correspondent

As NPR's correspondent covering campaign finance and lobbying, Peter Overby totes around a business card that reads Power, Money & Influence Correspondent. Some of his lobbyist sources call it the best job title in Washington.

Overby was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia silver baton for his coverage of the 2000 campaign and the 2001 Senate vote to tighten the rules on campaign finance. The citation said his reporting "set the bar" for the beat.

In 2008, he teamed up with the Center for Investigative Reporting on the Secret Money Project, an extended multimedia investigation of outside-money groups in federal elections.

Joining with NPR congressional correspondent Andrea Seabrook in 2009, Overby helped to produce Dollar Politics, a multimedia examination of the ties between lawmakers and lobbyists, as Congress considered the health-care overhaul bill. The series went on to win the annual award for excellence in Washington-based reporting given by the Radio and Television Correspondents Association.

Because life is about more than politics, even in Washington, Overby has veered off his beat long enough to do a few other stories, including an appreciation of R&B star Jackie Wilson and a look back at an 1887 shooting in the Capitol, when an angry journalist fatally wounded a congressman-turned-lobbyist.

Before coming to NPR in 1994, Overby was senior editor at Common Cause Magazine, where he shared a 1992 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for magazine writing. His work has appeared in publications ranging from the Congressional Quarterly Guide to Congress and Los Angeles Times to the Utne Reader and Reader's Digest (including the large-print edition).

Overby is a Washington-area native and lives in Northern Virginia with his family.

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Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., in a June 2018 file photo. Brat lost his re-election bid to Democrat Abigail Spanberger. Before the election, Brat blamed the Democratic fundraising platform, ActBlue, for allowing Spanberger to raise more money than he was able to. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. holds a news conference following the 2018 midterm elections on Nov. 7, 2018. Pelosi expects to lead the House Democrats and plans an agenda focused on promoting campaign finance reform, an expansion of voting rights and overhauling political redistricting. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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