Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
Mary Louise Kelly 2018 square
Stories By

Mary Louise Kelly

Stephen Voss/NPR
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The author Edna O'Brien's latest book is Girl, which follows a young woman kidnapped by Boko Haram in Nigeria. Eamonn McCabe/Guardian News and Media Ltd/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux hide caption

toggle caption
Eamonn McCabe/Guardian News and Media Ltd/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Edna O'Brien On 6 Decades Of Writing 'Very Difficult Stories' About Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/769457715/769517002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Petra Mayer/NPR

Lauren Groff's Literary Mission: Recovering A Lost Short Story Master

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/766927027/766927030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Unbelievable, Kaitlyn Dever plays a rape victim who recants her story following intimidation by police. The Netflix series is based on a true story. Beth Dubber/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Beth Dubber/Netflix

Marie's Rape Was Deemed 'Unbelievable.' Kaitlyn Dever Portrays Her Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760220278/760264513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anne Wojcicki, chief executive officer and co-founder of 23andMe, speaks during the TechCrunch Disrupt 2018 summit in San Francisco in September 2018. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Female CEOs Blast 'Forbes' List Of Innovative Leaders That Includes Only One Woman

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759899375/759899376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Alabama helmet on December 31, 2016, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, GA. Scott Donaldson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Donaldson/Getty Images

Should Black Athletes Go To Black Schools?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/410268200/759899479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Journalists Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey attend the Brilliant Minds Initiative dinner at Gramercy Park Hotel Rooftop on May 1, 2018 in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

'New York Times' Reporters Explain How They United Women, Helping Trigger #MeToo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758904841/759157635" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'She Said' Documents The Reporting Leading To Harvey Weinstein's Arrest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758943443/758943444" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"It's almost a dying art form in that people cherry-pick songs and put them on playlists and so, I don't know that the listening audience really ever gets the sense of the full artistic statement," Sheryl Crow says. Dove Shore/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Dove Shore/Courtesy of the artist

Sheryl Crow Says 'Threads' Is Her Last Album. And She's OK With That

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/755079071/755555572" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Beth Novey/NPR

Real Disappearances Are The Premise For Laura Lippman's 'Lady In The Lake'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/742220303/745392622" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jim Bridenstine became NASA administrator in April 2018. He says that before the space agency can send humans to Mars, it has to get them back to the moon. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

50 Years After Apollo 11 Moon Landing, NASA Sets Its Sights On Mars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741281881/741967379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How The Push For Renewable Energy Is Changing Southwest Georgia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/735930649/735930653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An aerial view of the 52-megawatt solar farm built by Silicon Ranch in Hazlehurst, Ga. Ever cheaper and better solar technology, available land and lots of sunshine are driving demand for massive, utility-scale solar projects across the American Southeast. Silicon Ranch hide caption

toggle caption
Silicon Ranch

How Georgia Became A Surprising Bright Spot In The U.S. Solar Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733795962/735510443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
erhui1979/Getty Images

There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734121633/734165490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

University Of Alabama Returns $21.5 Million To Hugh Culverhouse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731385461/731385462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript