Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly

Stephen Voss/NPR
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

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For Poet Maggie Smith, An Ending Was The Beginning Of Her New Book

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Former CIA chief John Brennan has a new book out titled Undaunted. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Former Spy Chief Brennan Looks Back At Sept. 11 — And Ahead To Presidential Election

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The Man Who Ran Washington: The Life and Times of James A. Baker III, by Peter Baker and Susan Glasser Doubleday hide caption

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Doubleday

James Baker, 'The Man Who Ran Washington,' Laments Today's Politics

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Anita Hill, shown in 2017, is chair of the Hollywood Commission, which intends to combat sexual misconduct and gender inequities across the industry. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

Anita Hill On Sexual Harassment In Hollywood And Beyond

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Collateral Damage: Britain, America, and Europe in the Age of Trump, by Kim Darroch Public Affairs hide caption

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Public Affairs

Former British Ambassador To U.S. Reflects On Becoming Trump Persona Non Grata

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Police Chief Carmen Best listens during a news conference at City Hall in Seattle on July 13. Best is critical of a plan backed by several city council members that seeks to cut the police department's budget in half. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Seattle Police Chief On Proposed Budget Cuts And Calls For Reforms

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A voter casts a mail-in ballot at a drop box in West Chester, Pa., prior to the June 2 primary election. Statewide, Pennsylvania saw a nearly 18-fold increase in mail-in voting in the primary compared with 2016. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

'Swing County, USA' Prepares For Unprecedented Influx Of Ballots By Mail

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Protesters hold up a lighted sign reading "#sayhername" during a July 2015 vigil for Sandra Bland in Chicago. Bland died in a Texas jail after a traffic stop escalated into a physical confrontation. Authorities said Bland hanged herself, a finding her family disputed. Christian K. Lee/AP hide caption

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Christian K. Lee/AP

Say Her Name: How The Fight For Racial Justice Can Be More Inclusive Of Black Women

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Knopf

Privilege Takes Many Forms In 'Friends And Strangers'

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A face mask covers the mouth and nose of one of the iconic lion statues in front of the New York Public Library Main Branch on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in New York, amid the coronavirus pandemic. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Widespread Use Of Face Masks Could Save Tens Of Thousands Of Lives, Models Project

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The musicians on Not Our First Goat Rodeo, from left to right: Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile, Stuart Duncan and Edgar Meyer. Josh Goleman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Josh Goleman/Courtesy of the artist

Yo-Yo Ma: Goats, Rodeos And The Power Of Music

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Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey speaks Saturday with demonstrators calling for the defunding of his city's police department. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Minneapolis Mayor Wants 'Full Structural Revamp,' Not Abolition Of Police Department

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Author L.L. McKinney started the #PublishingPaidMe hashtag so authors could publicize racial disparities in book advances. Nicole McLaughlin hide caption

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Nicole McLaughlin

#PublishingPaidMe: Authors Share Their Advances To Expose Racial Disparities

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Brit Bennett says it has been "surreal" to publish her post-civil rights era book this week. She is also the author of The Mothers. Emma Trim/Riverhead Books hide caption

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Emma Trim/Riverhead Books

Brit Bennett Set Her Novel 50 Years Ago — She Didn't Expect It To Be 'Timely'

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The. Rev. Raphael G. Warnock, senior pastor of Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church, speaks at a January 2019 service to remember the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

What The Civil Rights Movement Of The '60s Can Teach Atlanta Protesters Now

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