Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine. She assumed the role in January 2018.

Previously, she was a national security correspondent for NPR News. Her reporting tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. As part of the national security team, she traveled extensively to investigate foreign policy and military issues. Kelly's assignments took her from the Khyber Pass to mosques in Hamburg, and from grimy Belfast bars to the deserts of Iraq. Her first assignment at NPR was senior editor of the award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, All Things Considered.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

During her spell away from full-time reporting, Kelly's writing appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She also launched and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. And she joined The Atlantic as a contributing editor. She continues to hold that role, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a local political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched Public Radio International's The World. The following year Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government and French language and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European Studies at Cambridge University in England.

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Story Archive

All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly (right) records a standup with producer Becky Sullivan at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang ahead of a military parade marking the 70th anniversary of North Korea's founding. David Guttenfelder for NPR hide caption

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David Guttenfelder for NPR

What It Looks Like Inside A Classroom In North Korea

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Kathy Mattea plays live in NPR Studios. Eric Lee/NPR hide caption

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How Kathy Mattea Got Her Voice Back With 'Pretty Bird'

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Some North Koreans Puzzled By U.S. Call For Denuclearization

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The View From North Korea As The Country Celebrates 70 Years

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In North Korea, Parade Features No Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles

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North Korean military tanks drive at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang during a mass military parade to mark its 70th anniversary as a nation. David Guttenfelder for NPR hide caption

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In A Break From Recent Precedent, North Korean Anniversary Parade Features No ICBMs

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Former Secretary Of State John Kerry On His New Memoir 'Every Day Is Extra'

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Raising Kids In An 'Age Of Fear' Results In Impossible Choices For Parents

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Yo-Yo Ma plays selections from Bach's Cello Suites at NPR Music's Tiny Desk. Samantha Clark/NPR hide caption

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Yo-Yo Ma, A Life Led With Bach

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"The idea behind this is not to create a computer that makes music for me, it's to create an instrument that I'm playing," Ólafur Arnalds says. Eric Lee/NPR hide caption

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One Key, Many Notes: Ólafur Arnalds' Piano Rig Fuses Technology And Musicality

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Trump Refuses To Back Intelligence Agencies' Election Interference Findings

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Stacey Thomas, owner of the Bourbon Bar "The Lexington," says new tariffs on whiskey will hurt her business. "Customers that maybe would have tried bourbon will probably just go for a vodka or a gin or a rum," she says. Christina Cala/NPR hide caption

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