Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine. She assumed the role in January 2018.

Previously, she was a national security correspondent for NPR News. Her reporting tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. As part of the national security team, she traveled extensively to investigate foreign policy and military issues. Kelly's assignments took her from the Khyber Pass to mosques in Hamburg, and from grimy Belfast bars to the deserts of Iraq. Her first assignment at NPR was senior editor of the award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, All Things Considered.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

During her spell away from full-time reporting, Kelly's writing appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She also launched and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. And she joined The Atlantic as a contributing editor. She continues to hold that role, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a local political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched Public Radio International's The World. The following year Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government and French language and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European Studies at Cambridge University in England.

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In 'The Burning Shores,' Libya Blossoms — Briefly — Before Unraveling

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Could Syrian President Bashar al-Assad Be Tried As A War Criminal?

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Media Or Tech Company? Facebook's Profile Is Blurry

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Most Americans Feel They've Lost Control Of Their Online Data

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Retired Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum, left, and former assistant defense secretary Paul McHale, center, visit Utah National Guard troops as they extend a border fence in San Luis, Ariz., in 2006. Khampha Bouaphanh/AP hide caption

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Former National Guard Chief On What A 2006 Border Deployment Tells Us Today

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New Chinese tariffs will raise the price of many American crops, including almonds and other nuts. PM Images/Getty Images hide caption

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What Chinese Tariffs Targeting American Crops Will Mean For Farmers

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Daria Zhuk, 27, came forward in February — one of several female journalists to level claims of harassment against Leonid Slutsky, head of the powerful foreign affairs committee in the Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament. Jolie Myers/NPR hide caption

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How One Woman's Story Helped Set #MeToo In Motion In Russia

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The Bolshoi Theatre's new staging of Anna Karenina features Olga Smirnova as Anna and Andrei Merkuriev as Karenin. Elena Fetisova/Bolshoi Theatre hide caption

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An 'Anna Karenina' For Our Times At Moscow's Bolshoi Theatre

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After Election Landslide, It's Putin's Russia (More Than Ever)

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Russian Journalist Weighs In On Country's #MeToo Movement

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Russians In Moscow Celebrate 6 More Years Of Putin

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Russia's Bolshoi Theatre Brings Anna Karenina Ballet To Modern Era

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In Moscow, Russian voters will head to the polls on Sunday to cast their votes in the country's presidential election. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Election Watchdog Group In Moscow Says Russian Voter Fraud Is Rising

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