Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/Stephen Voss

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine. She assumed the role in January 2018.

Previously, she was a national security correspondent for NPR News. Her reporting tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. As part of the national security team, she traveled extensively to investigate foreign policy and military issues. Kelly's assignments took her from the Khyber Pass to mosques in Hamburg, and from grimy Belfast bars to the deserts of Iraq. Her first assignment at NPR was senior editor of the award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, All Things Considered.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

During her spell away from full-time reporting, Kelly's writing appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She also launched and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. And she joined The Atlantic as a contributing editor. She continues to hold that role, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a local political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched Public Radio International's The World. The following year Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government and French language and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European Studies at Cambridge University in England.

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One Key, Many Notes: Ólafur Arnalds' Piano Rig Fuses Technology And Musicality

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Trump Refuses To Back Intelligence Agencies' Election Interference Findings

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Stacey Thomas, owner of the Bourbon Bar "The Lexington," says new tariffs on whiskey will hurt her business. "Customers that maybe would have tried bourbon will probably just go for a vodka or a gin or a rum," she says. Christina Cala/NPR hide caption

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How Stakeholders In Relations Between The U.S. And U.K. Feel About Trump's Visit

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England Fans React To Loss During World Cup Semifinal

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As President Trump Criticizes NATO, Germany's Defense Minister Calls For Solidarity

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Looking Back At The Timeline Of President Trump's Travel Ban

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Tereza Lee is the original "Dreamer" whose case inspired the first attempt in 2001 to protect undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as minors. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Original DREAMer Recalls 'All Pervasive' Fear As An Undocumented Child

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In a handout photo, the inside of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility shows detainees inside fenced areas at Rio Grande Valley Centralized Processing Center in Rio Grande City, Texas, on June 17. Courtesy CBP/Handout/via Reuters hide caption

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Courtesy CBP/Handout/via Reuters

Migrant Children Heard Crying On Tape Are The Voices 'Left Out' Of Conversation

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Along with his trusty puppet, Daniel Tiger, Fred Rogers explained a complex world to kids in terms they could understand. His goal, says filmmaker Morgan Neville, was to "allay fear and promote love." Focus Features hide caption

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Mister Rogers Talked Frankly With Kids About 'Grown-Up' Issues That Weren't

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Former President Bill Clinton listens during a Monday interview about The President is Missing, a novel he wrote with James Patterson. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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In Bill Clinton's New Thriller, A (Fictional) President Faces Impeachment

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Advice For 'Grown-Ups' In Their 40s: 'Just Do What You Want More Often'

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