Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly

Stephen Voss/NPR
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

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Rebuilding Ukraine could cost hundreds of billions of dollars

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North Korea is reporting a major disease outbreak, but it's not calling it COVID

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Jakub Orlinski, the breakdancing countertenor, explores his Polish roots

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Swedish defense minister on decision to apply to NATO after decades of resistance

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The significance of McDonald's golden arches in Russia

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New York attorney general speaks to NPR about Buffalo shooting

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Alisa Amador is the winner of the 2022 Tiny Desk Contest Jacquelyn Marie / Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jacquelyn Marie / Courtesy of the artist

Meet Alisa Amador, the winner of the 2022 Tiny Desk Contest

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Downton Abbey is back, but this time the family is going on the road to France. ISABEL INFANTES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The new Downton Abbey film is here, and its creator says misery isn't compulsory

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Emma Straub on using time travel to escape the pandemic in 'This Time Tomorrow'

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Julian Fellowes of 'Downton Abbey' says misery isn't 'compulsory' in entertainment

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Shireen Abu Akleh did the stories no one wanted to do, says colleague

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Guy Aroch

Brooke Shields is getting older in the public eye — and she wants to talk about it

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Writer and political activist Gloria Steinem has fought for women's rights for decades. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Gloria Steinem's calls to protect bodily autonomy live on as Roe faces reversal

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Brooke Shields is aging in the public eye — and she wants to talk about it

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Gloria Steinem on the consequences of overturning Roe v. Wade

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