Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly

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Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

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Story Archive

Last year, at the future site of the California Indian Heritage Center in Sacramento, Gov. Gavin Newsom, left, with Assemblyman James Ramos, formally apologized to tribal leaders across the state for the violence, mistreatment and neglect inflicted on Native Americans throughout California history. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

With 1 Of Their Own In The Statehouse, Native Americans In California Win New Rights

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Yaquelin De La Cruz holds a COVID-19 vaccine during clinical trials in August at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Adviser On COVID-19 Vaccine Priority Groups And Why Some Aren't Eager To Be First

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2020 Book Concierge: Mary Louise Kelly Picks 'Hamnet' By Maggie O'Farrell

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Protesters call for support for tenants and homeowners at risk of eviction during a demonstration on Oct. 11 in Boston. A federal moratorium on evictions is set to expire at the end of December. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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'These Are Deaths That Could Have Been Prevented,' Says Researcher Studying Evictions

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An illustration picture shows vials with COVID-19 vaccine stickers attached and syringes with the logo of U.S. biotechnology company Moderna on November 17. Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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What It Was Like To Participate In The Clinical Trial For Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine

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Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla says he expects the company will produce enough of its COVID-19 vaccine to reach 25 million people by the end of the year. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Pfizer CEO On Next Steps For Coronavirus Vaccine And His Controversial Stock Trade

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Midshipman 1st Class Sydney Barber of Lake Forest, Ill., is slated to be the U.S. Naval Academy's first African American female brigade commander. It's the highest student leadership position at the academy. MC2 Nathan Burke/U.S. Naval Academy hide caption

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MC2 Nathan Burke/U.S. Naval Academy

Chuck Hagel, then U.S. defense secretary, speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels in 2015. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Ex-Defense Secretary Hagel Says GOP Hesitation On Election Is 'Hurting Our Country'

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Adrianne Lenker, lead vocalist and guitarist of Big Thief, released two solo albums in October, simply titled songs and instrumentals. Genesis Báez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Genesis Báez/Courtesy of the artist

Adrianne Lenker On Carving Out Space To Recover

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, shown here in 2018, took steps early on to contain the pandemic in his state. Justin Merriman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine Wishes Trump 'Had A More Happy Relationship With Masks'

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Love Is the King is a new solo album from Wilco's Jeff Tweedy, featuring his sons Spencer and Sammy. Whitten Sabbatini/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Family Reigns Supreme On Jeff Tweedy's New Album, 'Love Is The King'

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What It's Like To Be A Radio Host With Hearing Loss

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Colorado Gov. Jared Polis speaks during a news conference on Oct. 20 about the steady increase in new coronavirus cases in the state. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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Colorado Governor Faces Challenges As COVID-19 Cases Surge And Winter Approaches

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For Poet Maggie Smith, An Ending Was The Beginning Of Her New Book

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