Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly

Stephen Voss/NPR
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

Story Archive

Former governor whose bill was at the center of Roe ruling reacts to SCOTUS' decision

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Context and perspective on abortion and gun rights after this week's SCOTUS decisions

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Pro-gun leader reacts to Supreme Court ruling on New York concealed carry laws

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Russia's economy is weathering sanctions, but tough times are ahead

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There are a number of initiatives in the works to address PFAS in drinking water. ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images

PFAS 'forever chemicals' are everywhere. Here's what you should know about them

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White House economic adviser defends Biden's gas tax holiday

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SCOTUS and Roe questions, asked and answered

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Ukrainian activist pleads with Washington lawmakers for more military support

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Daryl McCormack and Emma Thompson star in the film, Good Luck To You, Leo Grande. Nick Wall/Searchlight Pictures hide caption

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Nick Wall/Searchlight Pictures

Emma Thompson on her new film — and the idea the female orgasm has to be performative

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Gabby Giffords was invited to Fenway Park this week as part of its Gun Violence Awareness Day. Vanessa Leroy /NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Leroy /NPR

Gabby Giffords is still fighting for gun violence victims, years after she became one

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Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) says the House Jan. 6 committee investigation will reveal new details of the insurrection for the public. Shuran Huang for NPR hide caption

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American democracy is more vulnerable now than on Jan. 6, Schiff says amid hearings

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Workers are seen by a row of armored vehicles at a military base in Nantou county, central Taiwan, on June 16, 2022. Taiwan says it could defend itself from an attack by China — but only with help from the international community. Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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China and Taiwan: What's Ukraine Got To Do With It?

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As DACA turns 10, some recipients are split between celebration and frustration

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Gabby Giffords reflects on this moment in time for gun safety measures

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