Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of NPR's All Things Considered.
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Mary Louise Kelly

Stephen Voss/NPR
Mary Louise Kelly 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Mary Louise Kelly

Host, All Things Considered

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

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What The Civil Rights Movement Of The '60s Can Teach Atlanta Protesters Now

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What Scientist Do And Don't Know About The Spread Of The Coronavirus

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A car drives down an otherwise empty Las Vegas Strip amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 8. Bridget Bennett/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bridget Bennett/AFP via Getty Images

'The Sheer Volume' Is Hard To Capture: Unemployment In Nevada Soars To Historic High

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The April 19 edition of The Boston Globe had 16 pages of obituaries. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

Obituary Writer Aims To Show How Coronavirus Impacts 'All People In Our Society'

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Feda Almaliti with her son, 15-year-old Muhammed, who has severe autism. "Muhammed is an energetic, loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now," she says. Feda Almaliti hide caption

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Feda Almaliti

'He's Incredibly Confused': Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

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A researcher works on the diagnosis of suspected COVID-19 cases in Belo Horizonte, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, on March 26, 2020. Douglas Magno /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Magno /AFP via Getty Images

Why The Race For A Coronavirus Vaccine Will Depend On Global Cooperation

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Gov. Gavin Newsom announced new criteria related to coronavirus hospitalizations and testing that could allow counties to open faster than the state during a news conference in Napa, Calif., on Monday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

California Gov. Newsom: Federal Government Has Responsibility To Help States Recover

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Jason Isbell released his band's new album Reunions, out today, one week early to independent record stores."I feel like it's important that we take care of the people who take care of us," he says. Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist

Jason Isbell On The Past Lives That Inspired His New Album, 'Reunions'

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And Then They Stopped Talking to Me: Making Sense of Middle School, by Judith Warner Crown hide caption

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Crown

Judith Warner's New Book On Middle School Suggests It Doesn't Have To Be All Bad

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Alaska Restaurant Owner: Reopening Far From Profitable, But Still Worth It

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Mayor Nan Whaley says Dayton, Ohio, hasn't seen any federal coronavirus relief funding, and the city has been forced to make critical cuts to public services. Daniel Sewell/AP hide caption

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Daniel Sewell/AP

Without Federal Funding, Ohio Mayor Faces 'Very Painful' Cuts To Services

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San Francisco's California Street, usually filled with cable cars, is seen empty on March 18, 2020, after residents were ordered to shelter in place in an effort to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Author Lawrence Wright's new novel imagines a mysterious virus that sweeps the globe. "All I'm doing is examining the world that we live in and extrapolating where it might go," he says. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

This Is 'Creepy': Lawrence Wright Wishes His Pandemic Novel Had Gotten It Wrong

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Homeland has come to an end after eight seasons. Claire Danes starred as CIA officer Carrie Mathison and Mandy Patinkin played her boss, Saul Berenson. Sifeddine Elamine/SHOWTIME hide caption

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Sifeddine Elamine/SHOWTIME

Who'd Have Thought We'd Be Watching The 'Homeland' Finale To 'De-Stress'?

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Lucinda Williams sees her new album Good Souls Better Angels as part of a long line of political country music. "Go back and listen to Woody Guthrie. It is my job, as far as I'm concerned," she says. Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist

'I Get Angry, Too': Lucinda Williams On Her Politically Charged New Album

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The Other Bennet Sister: A Novel, by Janice Hadlow Henry Holt & Co. hide caption

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Henry Holt & Co.

Elizabeth's More Serious Sister Mary Takes The Spotlight In 'The Other Bennet Sister'

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