Don Gonyea Don Gonyea is a NPR National Political Correspondent based in Washington, D.C., and travels throughout the United States covering elections and the country's political climate. His reports can be heard on all NPR programs and at NPR.org.
Doby Photography/NPR
Don Gonyea 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Don Gonyea

National Political Correspondent

Although Don Gonyea is a NPR National Political Correspondent based in Washington, D.C., he spends much of his time traveling throughout the United States covering campaigns, elections, and the political climate throughout the country. His reports can be heard on all NPR programs and at NPR.org.

During the 2000 presidential campaign, Gonyea chronicled the controversial election and the ensuing legal recount battles in the courts. At the same time George W. Bush moved into the White House in 2001, Gonyea started as NPR's White House Correspondent. He was at the White House on the morning of September 11, 2001, providing live reports following the evacuation of the building.

As White House correspondent, Gonyea covered the Bush administration's prosecution of wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq and during the 2004 campaign he traveled with President Bush and Democratic nominee John Kerry. In November 2006, Gonyea co-anchored NPR's coverage of historic elections when Democrats captured control of both houses of the US Congress. In 2008, Gonyea was the lead reporter covering the entire Obama presidential campaign for NPR, from the Iowa caucuses to victory night in Chicago. He was also there when candidate Obama visited the Middle East and Europe. He continued covering the White House and President Barack Obama until spring 2010, when he moved into his current position.

Gonyea has filed stories from around the globe, including Moscow, Beijing, London, Islamabad, Doha, Budapest, Seoul, San Salvador, and Hanoi. He attended President Bush's first ever meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin in Slovenia in 2001, and subsequent, at times testy meetings between the two leaders in St. Petersburg, Shanghai and Bratislava. He also covered Mr.Obama's first trip overseas as president.

In 1986, Gonyea got his start at NPR reporting from Detroit on labor unions and the automobile industry. He spent countless hours on picket lines and in union halls covering strikes, including numerous lengthy work stoppages at GM in the late 1990s. Gonyea also reported on the development of alternative fuel and hybrid-powered automobiles, Dr. Jack Kevorkian's assisted-suicide crusade, and the 1999 closing of Detroit's classic Tiger Stadium — the ballpark of his youth.

Over the years Gonyea has contributed to PBS's NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, the BBC, CBC, AP Radio, and the Columbia Journalism Review. He periodically teaches college journalism courses.

Gonyea has won numerous national and state awards for his reporting. He was part of the team that earned NPR a 2000 George Foster Peabody Award for the All Things Considered series "Lost & Found Sound."

A native of Monroe, Michigan, Gonyea is an honors graduate of Michigan State University.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

"The beauty of songs, I think, is if you do it right a lot of people can relate to it in their own way," Amanda Shires says. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Amanda Shires Won't 'Give Away The Secrets' Of Her Songs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634976197/635832675" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Revisiting The 1968 Republican Convention

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/635668388/635668398" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, pictured here in the Oval Office in 2016, reunite as a buddy-cop crime-solving duo in the new (entirely fictional) novel Hope Never Dies. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Barack And Joe Solve A Murder Mystery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/635395648/635668410" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Union activists and supporters rally Wednesday in Lower Manhattan against the Supreme Court's ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Labor Clout Takes A Hit In Supreme Court Ruling On Dues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624513403/624725792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Reassessing Organized Labor's Political Power After Supreme Court Ruling

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624566222/624566231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this file photo, Muhammad Ali is honored on March 14, 2001, receiving the UCP's Humanitarian Award from Donald Trump at the United Cerebral Palsy dinner at the New York Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City. George De Sota/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George De Sota/Getty Images

David Kennerly says this 1968 photo of his, taken in Los Angeles at the beginning of Robert F. Kennedy's presidential campaign, captures what it meant to cover the chaotic and carefree period as a photojournalist. "Everybody could get close, everybody wanted to," he says. David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

The Prodigal Son is Ry Cooder's first solo album in six years. On it, Cooder makes more traditional American gospel music his own. Beth Gwinn/Getty Images for Americana Music hide caption

toggle caption
Beth Gwinn/Getty Images for Americana Music

With 'The Prodigal Son,' Ry Cooder Puts His Own Touch On Gospel Music

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612841985/612859138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bettye LaVette's Things Have Changed is out now on Verve Records. Mark Seliger/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Seliger/Courtesy of the artist

'My Fifth Career': Bettye LaVette Reinvents Bob Dylan For Herself

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612088231/612697063" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Hits The Campaign Trail To Rally Republicans Before Midterms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610315720/610315721" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican senatorial candidate Don Blankenship (center) greets supporters Doug Smith and Wanda Smith prior to a town hall in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Nebraska Farmers Will Take Hit From Tariffs, But Will They Still Support Trump?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601951504/601951515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prominent Republicans, Democrats Looking Ahead To 2020 With New Hampshire Visits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599579167/599579196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript