Howard Berkes Howard Berkes is a correspondent for the NPR Investigations Unit.

A roof bolter secures the roof of a newly mined section of a coal mine. Studies show roof bolters sometimes have high exposure to the silica dust that is especially toxic to lungs. Thorney Lieberman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thorney Lieberman/Getty Images

Sheralin Greene, 57, mined coal for 20 years. She now suffers paralyzing coughing fits from black lung and receives payments and medical care from the federal trust fund. Courtesy of Sheralin Greene hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sheralin Greene

The rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung is growing in central Appalachia, according to a new study. Tyler Stableford/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tyler Stableford/Getty Images

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613400710/613403285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Scientific Studies Confirm A Spike In Black Lung Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613254363/613254364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Excised and preserved lungs on display at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Morgantown, W.Va., in 2012, show the dramatic effect of black lung disease. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Howard Berkes/NPR

Severe black lung disease deeply scarred the lung of a 61-year-old West Virginia coal miner, which was removed as part of a lung transplant. Courtesy of NIOSH hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of NIOSH

Kentucky Lawmakers Limit Black Lung Claims Reviews Despite Epidemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598484688/598630228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Florida state Sen. Gary Farmer speaks during the 2017 session in Tallahassee, Fla. He has introduced a new bill that would eliminate the false identity provision and clarify the statute so that it applies only to people who commit traditional workers' comp fraud, such as lying about injuries or eligibility for benefits. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Cannon/AP

David Zatezalo, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, was asked about the advanced black lung epidemic at a congressional hearing in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 6, 2018. Jingnan Huo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jingnan Huo/NPR

Black Lung Study Finds Biggest Cluster Ever Of Fatal Coal Miners' Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583456129/583778461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A broken window is seen at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino on Wednesday along the Las Vegas Strip. Investigators still don't understand why the shooter carried out his rampage. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Becker/Getty Images

Las Vegas Shooter's Life Comes Into Focus, But Not His Motive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555999373/556072193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What We Know, And Don't Know About The Las Vegas Shooter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555425823/555425824" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shooter Behind Las Vegas Massacre Had No Criminal Record

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555170297/555170298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. The mother of three spent the next year cycling through county and immigration jails. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. She was shuffled from county to immigration jails for a year and blames the sexual abuse of her daughter on her inability to protect her at home. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543650270/543973349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript