Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell and his colleagues voted to keep interest rates unchanged Wednesday, as they try to curb stubborn inflation. Saul Loeb/AFP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP

federal reserve

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A check on inflation and whether interest rates could be lowered

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Tuesday

Double-digit price increases have people shopping for less expensive insurance

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Sunday

The price of some goods and services is still bringing Americans down

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Friday

U.S. employers added 272,000 jobs in May, including 25,000 in restaurants and bars. The job gains were substantially higher than forecasters had predicted. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

May Jobs Report

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Tuesday

Sizzling summer temperatures are expected to drive electric bills higher this year. Nearly one in six families are already behind on their utility bills. Brendan Smialowski/AFP hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP

cooling costs

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Saturday

Friday

Americans are getting more cautious about how they spend their money

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Thursday

Prospective homebuyers must move fast because of a shortage of homes for sale

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Wednesday

It's a great time to be a home seller as lack of options spark bidding wars

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Rising prices remain a top concern for Americans, according to a new survey by the Federal Reserve. But 72% of adults say they're living comfortably financially or at least doing OK. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

FDIC chairman Martin Gruenberg — widely criticized for a toxic workplace at the agency — said Monday that he's willing to step down once a successor is confirmed by the Senate. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Wednesday

Consumer Price Index report for April gives an idea of where inflation stands

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Nearly 1 out of 5 credit card users have maxed out on their borrowing

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Tuesday

Credit card delinquencies rose in the first three months of the year. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, almost 1 in 5 card users is "maxed out," using at least 90% of their credit limit. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

More Americans are falling behind on credit card bills

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Monday

In this Oct. 10, 2018, file photo Amazon Prime boxes are loaded on a cart for delivery in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Friday

The U.S. Treasury ran a surplus in April, as tax payments jumped by 22% from a year ago. The federal government is still on track to run a deficit of more than $1.5 trillion this year. Al Drago/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Getty Images

Olivia and Liam were the most popular names for girls and boys in 2023, just as they have been in each of the last five years. Meg Oliphant/Getty Images for Rock 'n' Roll M hide caption

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Meg Oliphant/Getty Images for Rock 'n' Roll M

Thursday

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Tuesday

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Chairman Martin Gruenberg apologized to employees Tuesday, after an outside review found a toxic workplace culture at the agency. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Congress has less than a decade to fix Social Security before it runs short of cash

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Monday

Social Security's finances have improved slightly in the last year. But benefits are still facing an automatic cut in less than a decade unless Congress takes steps to prop up the program. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images