Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

A gas pump is seen at a gas station in Houston on June 9. Gas prices have dropped below $4 a gallon in parts of the country, although the national average remains above that level. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Gas prices are finally dropping. Here are 4 things to know

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The unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, matching its lowest level in the last 50 years

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A 'We Want You!' sign is posted at an Ike's Love & Sandwiches store in Los Angeles on July 26. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The job market got even better, in a surprisingly positive sign for the economy

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Gasoline prices have fallen recently, but experts warn that prices could rise again

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The changes the Fed is making in the face of historically high inflation

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Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Fed's mission improbable: Beating inflation without causing a recession

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The overheated U.S. housing market is starting to cool down

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Retail sales, inflation and the Fed

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US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on efforts to lower high gas prices in the South Court Auditorium at Eisenhower Executive Office Building June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Presidents Can't Fix Inflation. It Doesn't Stop Americans From Blaming Them For It.

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Inflation hit 9.1% in June

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Gas prices are displayed on a sign at a gas station in Williams, Ariz., on Wednesday, July 6, 2022. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

No retreat in the summer heat. Inflation blistering at 9.1% in June

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Fewer jobs were added in June, but the labor market is still tight. A man walks past a "now hiring" sign posted outside of a restaurant in Arlington, Va., last month. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Hiring slipped only slightly in June, with no sign of a looming recession

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While job growth has slowed, the labor market remains an economic bright spot

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