Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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Story Archive

Why The Tragic Fire At Notre Dame Has Led People To Be So Generous

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Damage seen from inside Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris on Tuesday. President Emmanuel Macron has set a five-year goal to rebuild the cathedral after Monday's blaze. Christophe Petit Tesson/AP hide caption

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Christophe Petit Tesson/AP

Donation Pledges Roll In For Notre Dame's Reconstruction

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The IRS budget has been cut sharply over the past decade, but President Trump has suggested spending an extra $362 million on tax enforcement next year. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

On Tax Day, The IRS Is Short Of Money

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A new Airbus A320neo aircraft is presented by the Spanish airline Vueling at Barcelona's airport on Sept. 27, 2018. The Trump administration is preparing to slap tariffs on imports from Europe, citing subsidies of Airbus jets. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

A pile of newly minted $1 coins honoring former President Thomas Jefferson are unveiled by the U.S. Mint in Washington, D.C., in 2007. In a turnaround, congressional analysts are no longer recommending a phaseout of paper dollars in favor of a dollar coin. Jim Young/Reuters hide caption

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Jim Young/Reuters

Government Watchdog Flips On Dollar Coin

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The Latest On Trump's Plans To Appoint Political Allies To The Federal Reserve Board

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Plumber Zakiyyah Askia welds pipes at a high-rise residence under construction in Chicago on Jan. 24. U.S. employers added 196,000 jobs in March, a rebound from February's weak growth, the Labor Department said Friday. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Trump Considers Herman Cain For Federal Reserve Board

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Former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain addresses the Americans for Prosperity Presidential Forum on Feb. 25, 2012, in Troy, Mich. President Trump says he plans to nominate Cain to a vacant spot on the Federal Reserve Board. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Trucks wait to enter the United States at the border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, in 2017. More than $1.6 billion in goods flow across the border each day. Jorge Duenes/Reuters hide caption

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Jorge Duenes/Reuters

How Closing The Border Would Affect U.S. Economy, From Avocados To Autos

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Linda McMahon had contributed heavily to Donald Trump's 2016 election effort. At America First Action, she could play a similar role in his 2020 bid for re-election. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump said on Friday that he will nominate conservative TV commentator and former Trump campaign adviser Stephen Moore to the Federal Reserve Board. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Economists Forecast Stephen Moore Wouldn't Be Good For Fed Post

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