Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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Story Archive

Demonstrators listen to speeches during a rally in support of abortion rights on Thursday in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Abortion Limits Carry Economic Cost For Women

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Dani Izzie at her home in rural Virginia. More than a decade ago, she slipped in the bathroom and suffered a spinal cord injury that has left her unable to walk. She works as a social media manager for Spinergy, a company that makes high-performance wheels for wheelchairs. Greg Kahn for NPR hide caption

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Greg Kahn for NPR

Many Are Replacing Disability Checks With Paychecks

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Courtney Hering, who is getting married next year, is planning a slightly more lavish wedding reception. After seven years at Kohler, she finally feels like she has found a professional home. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

2-Tiered Wages Under Fire: Workers Challenge Unequal Pay For Equal Work

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Trump Softens Escalating Iran War Rhetoric

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Jerry Castillo prepares a steel pipe at the Borusan Mannesmann Pipe manufacturing facility Tuesday, June 5, 2018, in Baytown, Texas. The company is seeking a waiver from the steel tariff to import tubing and casing. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Tariff Waivers Let U.S. Government Pick Winners And Losers

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Trade Talks End With No Agreement

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Cargo is unloaded from a container ship at the main port terminal in Long Beach, Calif., on Friday. Two days of trade talks between the U.S. and China ended without a deal to avert more tariffs. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

White House Follows Through With Tariff Hikes On Chinese Imports

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U.S.-China Talks: How Did We Get Here?

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U.S. Farmers Have Multiple Concerns When It Comes To Trade Talks

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A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer at DiMare Farms in Florida City, Fla., in 2013. The Trump administration is preparing to level a new tariff on fresh tomatoes imported from Mexico in response to complaints from Florida growers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Food Fight: Trump Administration Levels Tariffs On Mexican Tomatoes

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Frustrated With Trade Talks, Trump Threatens China With Tariffs

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Unemployment Falls To Lowest Level In Almost 50 Years

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Betty Fernandez of Macy's department store speaks with a potential applicant about job openings during a job fair in Miami on April 5. Employers added far more jobs than expected in April — another sign the U.S. economy is chugging along as the expansion nears the 10-year mark. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Unemployment Drops To 3.6%, 263,000 Jobs Added, Showing Economy Remains Strong

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