Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Prices Are Still Going Up, But Not As Dramatically As Prior Months

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Inflation Slowed A Bit Last Month, But Prices Are Still Rising

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Key Inflation Indicator Will Be Updated With August Data

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Packages of beef cuts are displayed at a Costco store on May 24 in Novato, Calif. The prices of meats have surged, and the White House is partly blaming the handful of meatpackers that control the industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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High Meat Prices Are Helping Fuel Inflation, And A Few Big Companies Are Being Blamed

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A Handful Of Big Meat Packing Companies May Be Pushing Up The Price Of Groceries

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Did Ending Pandemic UI Benefits Push Americans Back To Work?

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What The End Of Unemployment Aid Means For The Job Market And Economy

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Driven By Delta Surge, August Hiring Dips Sharply

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Hiring Slowed In August With The Surge In Coronavirus Cases

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A hiring sign gets displayed in a store window in New York City in August. Last month saw a sharp slowdown in hiring from previous months as the pandemic wears on and creates uncertainty. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Analysts Expect August's Job Gains To Be Smaller Than Previous Gains

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Marianne LeBlanc stages in-person corporate events. But those jobs disappeared during the pandemic and have been slow to return. Kelly Creative hide caption

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Kelly Creative

Millions Lose Jobless Benefits Today. It Doesn't Mean They'll Be Rushing Back To Work

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Pandemic Jobless Benefits End Next Week For Millions Of Unemployed Americans

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