Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

A battle over taxes continues to brew as the IRS is seeking to obtain more bank account information, a move strongly opposed by Republicans and the lenders themselves. Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Does the IRS really want to spy on your bank account? The latest tax fight, explained

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Tracking bank account information could help curb tax evasion, but there's pushback

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The Fed announces stricter rules on trading for policymakers and senior staff

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. The Fed announced new restrictions on investments by senior officials after being rocked by a controversy involving trading by two regional Fed bank presidents last year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. Powell's term expires early next year, and President Biden must decide whether to reappoint him. Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief

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Gas, food and transportation network shortages all helped drive up consumer prices

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As prices increase because of inflation, consumers are forced to pay more

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The price of glass jars to hold pasta sauce and other products has soared during the pandemic. Sauce-maker Paul Guglielmo in Rochester, N.Y., has absorbed some of the increase, but he has also raised prices for consumers. Paul Guglielmo hide caption

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Paul Guglielmo

Cargo traffic jams affect glass bottles too. Your pantry staples could cost more

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Pandemic supply-chain issues now mean a shortage of glass jars and bottles

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3 economists have been awarded the Nobel for their work on 'natural experiments'

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Displayed is a file photo of a Nobel Prize medal on Dec. 8, 2020. The Nobel Prize in economic sciences was awarded to three U.S-based professors for their pioneering work with "natural experiments." Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Three economists win Nobel for their research on how real life events impact society

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3 U.S.-based economists win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics

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Far fewer jobs were added in September than forecasted

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Latest jobs report sheds more light on how the U.S. economy is doing

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The unemployment rate dipped to 4.8% in September, from 5.2% in August, although some of that decline resulted from people dropping out of the workforce. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

August's jobs numbers were bad. September was even worse, but there's room for hope

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