Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

U.S. Employers Add 1.8 million Jobs In July

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Wilkin Soto works on a customer at the Castillo Barbershop, in Lawrence, Mass., on June 5. The pace of hiring has slowed from June, when employers added a record 4.8 million jobs. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Congress Fails To Reach Agreement On New COVID-19 Relief Bill

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The extra $600-a-week unemployment benefit has kept jobless people from plummeting into further debt and has allowed for sustained spending, a boon for the struggling economy. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. Economy On High Alert Over Shaky Future Of Extra Jobless Benefits

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Fraud Doesn't Slow Down Main-In Voting—Security Measures Do.

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Pandemic-Weakened U.S. Economy Threatens Trump's Hopes For Reelection

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The Pandemic Has Hit Some Businesses Hard, Others Are Benefiting

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Experts Doubt The Strength Of Economy's Recovery As Coronavirus Rates Grow

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3 Months Of Hell: U.S. Economy Drops 32.9% In Worst GDP Report Ever

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Fed Wraps Up Policy Meeting Over Ways To Fortify Economy Shaken By The Pandemic

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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has suggested that if federal jobless benefits are extended, it will be in a different form than the flat $600 per week. Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images

The End Of $600 Unemployment Benefits Will Hit Millions Of Households And The Economy

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Unemployment Remains High, But Spending Is Improving Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

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Federal Tax Filing Deadline Arrives

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With the help of his children, Knoxville, Tenn., resident Matt Harris put the finishing touches on his dream treehouse on Father's Day. Matt Harris hide caption

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Matt Harris

Stay-At-Home Improvement: DIY Builders Help Drive Up Lumber Prices

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