Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
Stories By

Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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Story Archive

U.S. Trade Office To Hold Hearings On Planned Tariffs On China

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President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping are expected to talk about trade on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, later this month. Thomas Peter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Peter/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Turns Trade Talks Into Spectator Sport

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Iowa Residents Have Flooding And Trade On The Mind During Trump's Visit

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Tariff Battle With Mexico Ends, But What About Trade War With China?

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Why The Stock Market Went Up After The Labor Department Released Weak Jobs Report

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An F-150 pickup is assembled at a Ford plant in Dearborn, Mich., last year. Manufacturing has been a soft spot in recent months. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Hiring Slows Amid Trade Tensions, With Only 75,000 Jobs Added In May

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A View From Both Sides Of The Border On Planned U.S. Tariffs On Mexico

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Johnson & Johnson faces multiple lawsuits, including one over the opioid epidemic. A reputation for corporate responsibility, dating back to the Tylenol scandal, offers a measure of protection, but no guarantee, analysts say. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Johnson & Johnson, Under Fire, Has Track Record Of Weathering Trouble

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The unemployment rate in the U.S. is the lowest it's been in 50 years. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Episode 917: Quit Threat!

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Demonstrators listen to speeches during a rally in support of abortion rights on Thursday in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Abortion Limits Carry Economic Cost For Women

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Dani Izzie at her home in rural Virginia. More than a decade ago, she slipped in the bathroom and suffered a spinal cord injury that has left her unable to walk. She works as a social media manager for Spinergy, a company that makes high-performance wheels for wheelchairs. Greg Kahn for NPR hide caption

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Greg Kahn for NPR

Many Are Replacing Disability Checks With Paychecks

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Courtney Hering, who is getting married next year, is planning a slightly more lavish wedding reception. After seven years at Kohler, she finally feels like she has found a professional home. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

2-Tiered Wages Under Fire: Workers Challenge Unequal Pay For Equal Work

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