Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

A farmer holds soybeans from her Nebraska farm in 2019. Today, farmers are struggling to find containers that can ship their products to Asia. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Farmers Have A Big Problem On Their Hands: They Can't Find A Way To Ship Their Stuff

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Transportation Tie-Ups Are Causing Headaches For The Export Business

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, pictured on Capitol Hill last month, called for a permanent expansion of the child tax credit during an interview with NPR on Thursday. Greg Nash/Pool photo/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool photo/Getty Images

Families Are Receiving A Child Tax Credit. Janet Yellen Says It Should Be Permanent

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Fed Chair Powell Says Recent Spike In Prices Is Temporary

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The Inflation Rate Is Now The Highest It's Been Since 2008

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Inflation Is The Highest Its Been In Nearly 13 Years

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Used Challengers sit in a long line at a Dodge dealership on Jan. 24 in Littleton, Colo. Used car prices may be peaking and that could help reinforce hopes for easing inflation. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Inflation Is Still High. Used Car Prices Could Help Explain What Happens Next

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Stock Market Slumps Just After The S&P 500 Index, Nasdaq Hit Record Highs

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Lumber is stacked up for sale at a Home Depot store in May in Doral, Fla. Lumber prices surged during the pandemic, only to fall as the economy started to open up again. But prices remain volatile and still more expensive than pre-pandemic levels. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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What The Rise And Fall Of Lumber Prices Tell Us About The Pandemic Economy

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Businesses Are Rapidly Hiring And Wages Are Up — But There Still Aren't Workers

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June's Labor Data Is Not As Strong As Many Employers Would Have Liked

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A "Help Wanted" sign is displayed at a gas station in Los Angeles. After surviving the pandemic, small businesses across the country are struggling to find workers Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Business Should Be Booming — If Only There Were Enough Workers For The Job

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