Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
Stories By

Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Sunday

As the election approaches, both parties adopt a protectionist stance against China

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Thursday

Inflation is more stubborn than expected this year. One reason is rising rents

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Tuesday

The IRS commissioner faced tough questions from Senate Finance Committee

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Thursday

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Wednesday

Friday

Hiring accelerated in the U.S. in March, adding 303,000 jobs, according to a report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate dipped to 3.8%, staying under 4% for more than two full years. People walk past a Home Depot in San Rafael, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Construction boom helps fuel job gains in March

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Thursday

The IRS has a free digital tax filing system. Here's what users are saying

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Monday

Thursday

Why Treasury Secretary Yellen traveled to the political battleground state of Georgia

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Wednesday

Daniel Kahneman, who received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013, has died. He merged psychology and economics to help launch the growing field of "behavioral economics." Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sunday

The Internal Revenue Service says that beefed up customer service is resulting in fewer hiccups this tax filing season. More than 71 million Americans have already filed taxes this spring. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

This tax season, IRS launches e-filing, goes after wealthy tax evaders

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Friday

A 'For Sale' sign is posted on the lawn in front of a home on March 15, 2024, in Miami, Fla. The National Association of Realtors announced that it had reached a nationwide $418 settlement of claims that the industry had conspired to keep agent commissions high. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Sales of existing homes jumped sharply in February. More 'For Sale' signs are up

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Wednesday

The Fed is still on track to cut interest rates this year, but not yet

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Federal Reserve Bank Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference on March 20, 2024 in Washington, DC. Following a meeting of the Federal Open Markets Committee, Powell announced that the Fed left interest rates unchanged, but projects it may cut rates three times later this year. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Friday

This nationwide settlement could change the way Americans buy homes

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A "Sale Pending" sign is posted in front of a home for sale on Nov. 30, 2023, in San Anselmo, California. Real estate agents face lower commissions after a major settlement has upended the way Americans buy and sell homes. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A major settlement could spell an end to 6% real estate commissions

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Thursday

Most boomers want to stay in their own homes as they get older

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Tuesday

Inflation was higher than expected in February

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The Fed wants to see inflation fall closer to 2% before lowering interest rates

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Friday

U.S. employers added more jobs in February than expected, but unemployment inched up

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Thursday

President Joe Biden delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, March 7, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP