Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

A man wearing a protective mask looks at piled-up trash in New York City on April 24. Cities are struggling with collection as the volume of residential garbage surges during the stay-at-home era. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

'Hard, Dirty Job': Cities Struggle To Clear Garbage Glut In Stay-At-Home World

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Millions of gig workers have come to depend on a government lifeline that's set to expire at the end of the year. Above, a man wearing a face mask walks past a sign saying "now hiring" on May 14 in Arlington, Va. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Gig Workers Depend On New Unemployment Program, But Fear It'll End Soon

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said the Fed is ready to support the economy as a recovery falters. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Median household income rose sharply last year, while poverty declined to 10.5% — the lowest since records began in 1959, according to the Census Bureau. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

American Incomes Were Rising, Until The Pandemic Hit

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Grocery prices have fallen in recent months but are still 4.6% higher than at this time last year. Here, a woman stock shelves in a deli in June at a Washington, D.C., supermarket. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

More Groceries, Less Gas: The Pandemic Is Shaking Up The Cost Of Living

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COVID-19 Is Changing The Way We Spend Money, Affecting Inflation

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A triage team screens patients outside the Emergency Department at Owensboro Health. The hospital lost two-thirds of its revenue while elective surgeries were halted, but it didn't lay off any workers. Owensboro Health hide caption

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Owensboro Health

Kentucky City Enjoys Booming Economy Amid Pandemic As Rest Of Country Reels

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The U.S. Adds 1.4 Million Jobs In August, But Job Growth Is Slowing Down

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks to reporters in March in Washington, D.C. In an interview Friday with NPR, Powell said it may take years before the economy has fully recovered. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Fed's Jerome Powell: Jobless Rate Better Than Expected; Recovery To Take A Long Time

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A construction worker roofs an apartment complex in Uniondale, N.Y., on May 27. U.S. employers added fewer jobs last month even as the unemployment rate fell to 8.4%. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

One Kentucky Town Has Almost Recovered From Its Job Losses During The Pandemic

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Diana Yitbarek seeks information about her unemployment claim in Washington, D.C., in July. Applications for jobless benefits nationwide have been dropping but remain very high by historical standards. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Sheets of $1 bills run through the printing press in 2015 at the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, D.C. National debt is expected to reach an all-time high of 107% of gross domestic product in 2023. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. To Owe More Than The Size Of Its Economy For The 1st Time In 75 Years

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President Trump signs one of four executive orders addressing the economic fallout from the pandemic in Bedminster, N.J., on Aug. 8. The Trump administration has given employers the option to stop collecting payroll taxes, but workers may have to repay the money next year. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Payroll Tax Delay Is Here, But So Is Confusion About It

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