Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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Story Archive

UAW's Strike Against GM Brings To Mind Last Century's Labor Battles

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the Fed cut rates to "help keep the U.S. economy strong in the face of some notable developments and to provide insurance against ongoing risks." Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Fed Cuts Interest Rates To Prop Up The Slowing Economy

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World Oil Prices Spike After Saudi Facilities Attacked

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Does Tariff Delay Signal A Chance For Trade War Deal With China?

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Next Round Of U.S. China Trade Talks Is Unlikely To End The Trade War

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is under the microscope for reportedly pressuring government scientists to back President Trump over a misleading tweet about Hurricane Dorian. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Wilbur Ross At The Center Of Another Political Storm, This Time About The Weather

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Monthly Jobs Report Shows Fresh Signs Of Slowing U.S. Economy

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The manufacturing sector has seen a slowdown amid the continuing U.S. trade war with China. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Tepid U.S. Jobs Report Adds To Economic Jitters

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Gil Rodriguez constructs a door at the Howard McCray's commercial refrigeration manufacturing facility in Philadelphia last October. Manufacturing activity in the U.S. shrank last month for the first time in three years. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Manufacturing Shrinks For 1st Time In 3 Years On Trade Tensions

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New Import Taxes Underscore China's Role As Growing U.S. Food Supplier

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Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D'Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that's down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

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Markets Fall After Trump Tweets

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