Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Raising interest rates is a lesson Powell learned from former Fed chair Paul Volcker

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Renovations continue on the Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building on September 19, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) concluded its two-day meeting on interest rates this afternoon. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Fed orders another super-sized interest rate hike as it battles stubborn inflation

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In happier times, Susan Morrison and her husband Calvin liked to vacation in their motor home. But they've had to park it this year because of the high cost of diesel fuel. Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison hide caption

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Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison

Americans are paying more and getting less as inflation hits home

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Vehicles drive past a sign on the 110 Freeway warning of extreme heat and urging energy conservation during a heat wave in downtown Los Angeles on Sept. 2. Soaring electricity bills are pinching many household budgets across the country even as gasoline prices have come down. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Soaring electricity bills are the latest inflation flashpoint

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U.S. employers added 315,000 jobs in August

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A man walks past a "now hiring" sign posted outside of a restaurant in Arlington, Va., on June 3. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. jobs market is likely to be another bright spot in the economy this month

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Cattle graze amid drought conditions near Ojai, Calif., on June 21. Drought in parts of the country have forced some ranchers to slaughter their cattle early, leading to a drop in beef prices that will only be temporary. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Droughts are hitting cattle ranchers hard – and that could make beef more expensive

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Beef prices are down right now. But that may not last

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Student loan borrowers stage a rally in front of The White House on Aug. 25 to celebrate President Biden cancelling student debt. The plan has sparked heated debate, including about its economic fairness. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for We the 45m hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for We the 45m

Is it fair to forgive student loans? Examining 3 of the arguments of a heated debate

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Stocks tumble after Fed announces plan to keep interest rates up

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Interest rates will rise until inflation is under control, Fed chair Powell says

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference following a Fed policy meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 27. Powell warned on Friday the central bank is committed to bring down inflation even if it causes some economic pain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fed chief Jerome Powell is under pressure to curb inflation

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