Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

A builder sands the body of a guitar at the Fender factory, in Corona, California, on October 6, 2022. Industries sensitive to rising interest rates have been slowing hiring. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

Job market cooled only slightly last month, as employers added 263,000 jobs

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The Fed continues raising interest rates to fight inflation

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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Consumer prices in October were 7.7% higher than a year ago

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People shop for bread at a supermarket in Monterey Park, California on October 19, 2022. Grocery prices were up 12.4% last month from a year earlier, a government report showed. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

The Broughton family prepares for their dinner prayers during a gathering on November 26, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Prices for Thanksgiving staples like turkey are on the rise this year, thanks to inflation. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Rising prices are on the menu for Thanksgiving, with inflation currently at 7.7%

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A man ponders the options at a Dollar Store in Alhambra, California. Shoppers continue to face high prices on everyday goods. Inflation is the top voter concern in the midterm elections. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Inflation is top issue in this week's midterms

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U.S. employers added 261 thousand jobs last month, but job growth has slowed

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Workers attach siding to a house at a new home construction site in Trappe, Maryland, on October 28, 2022. Rising interest rates could mean slowing job growth in construction and manufacturing. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. hiring cooled slightly in October. That could help to ease inflation

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What's next for the Fed after efforts to fight inflation with higher interest rates

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell attends a meeting of the International Monetary and Financial Committee in Washington, DC, on Oct. 14. Powell announced another interest rate hike on Wednesday. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed orders another jumbo interest rate hike. Many are wondering what's next

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GDP, LNG and Meta's Q3

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The U.S. economy rebounded in July, August and September

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People shop in a Manhattan store on Oct. 26, 2022 in New York City. Inflation, in the form of higher prices for gas, food and other consumer goods is weighing on U.S. economic growth. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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New GDP report shows an economic turnaround, but don't be fooled

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Americans are concerned about their economy, and the global economic outlook is worse

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