Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Economists are weighing in on America's baby formula shortage

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Fed chief Powell, confirmed for a 2nd term, is under pressure to rein in inflation

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference in Washington, D.C., on May 4. Powell was confirmed by the Senate to a second term leading the central bank. Fighting inflation will define his legacy. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Fed Chair Jerome Powell is confirmed for a 2nd term. Inflation will be his focus

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The soaring costs of basic necessities such as food and housing are disproportionately hitting people with lower incomes. Here, a house is available for rent in Los Angeles on March 15. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Inflation may be easing — but low-income people are still paying the steepest prices

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Rising prices are the talk around a lot of kitchen tables these days

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This week in economics

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Wages are rising, but can't keep up with cost of living — and could worsen inflation

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An unusually tight job market has a potential downside for the broader economy

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The Fed is rapidly unwinding its easy money policies to fight inflation

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies about monetary policy and the state of the economy before the House Financial Services Committee in Washington, D.C., on March 2. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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The Fed raises interest rates by the most in over 20 years to fight inflation

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The Federal Reserve is expected to take a big step to try to lower inflation

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell collects his notebooks as he testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on March 3. The Fed is widely expected to raise interest rates by half a percentage point at its meeting this week. Jonathan Ernst/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Consumers spent more than expected in March, which is helping with economic recovery

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