Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Story Archive

Restaurants, like this McDonald's in Miami Beach, Fla., have been big engines of job growth. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hiring slowed sharply in November, even before omicron, with 210,000 jobs added

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Omicron variant could become another speedbump on the road to economic recovery

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Inflation means recreating 'The Twelve Days of Christmas' for 2021 will cost more

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Stocks tumble as investors weighed potential effects from omicron variant

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at the start of trading on Monday following Friday's steep decline in global stocks over fears of the new omicron coronavirus variant discovered in South Africa. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocks dive over the potential economic fallout from the omicron variant

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President Biden addressed rising inflation in his economy speech

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Biden chooses to keep Fed Chairman Powell in place for a second term

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Jeromonomics 2.0

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President Biden has nominated Jerome Powell to remain Fed chair

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been selected for a second term at the helm of the Fed, a move likely to be welcomed by markets. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden reappoints Jerome Powell as Fed chairman at a critical time for the economy

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Some consumers are wondering why President Biden is not doing more to counter surging prices across the economy. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Inflation is surging and people are hopping mad

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An inflatable snowman and candy canes are part of the decorations that adorn houses in Brooklyn's Dyker Heights neighborhood on Dec. 22, 2020 in New York. A shopping surge by households this year has snarled up global supply chains, and now the race is on to get products on shelves in time for Christmas. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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The race is on to save Christmas as retailers fight the supply chain crunch

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White House economic adviser weighs in on the inflation spike and spending plan

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Inflation surges to its highest since 1990

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