Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

State And Local Governments Argue Over Whether Relief Money Is Too Much Or Too Little

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Children attend online classes at the Crenshaw Family YMCA in Los Angeles. Schools are having a hard time covering the costs required for in-person and online learning during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Dec. 2, 2020. Powell appeared before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday and argued the U.S. economy still has a long way to go to recover millions of lost jobs. Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Fed Chair Jerome Powell Warns Of Long Road Ahead To Recover Millions Of Lost Jobs

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U.S. Retail Spending Jumps, Coincident With Federal Relief Payments

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Lawmakers Debate Biden's $1.9 Trillion COVID-19 Relief Plan

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Sheets of one-dollar bills run through the printing press at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in 2015 in Washington, D.C. Congressional forecasters projected the federal deficit this fiscal year will hit its highest since World War II. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A store in Boston displays a sign noting its Black ownership on June 24, 2020. Black-owned businesses struggled to get coronavirus emergency loans last year, until community lenders stepped in to help. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Small Local Banks Make A Big Difference For Black-Owned Businesses Trying To Hang On

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Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

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Neera Tanden, Nominee To Head Budget Office, Apologizes For Insulting GOP Senators

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Neera Tanden, President Biden's nominee for director of the Office and Management and Budget, speaks during a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee confirmation hearing on Tuesday. Tanden apologized for past insults to Republicans. Ting Shen/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Ting Shen/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. Slowly Whittles Away At Mountain Of Pandemic Job Losses, Jobs Report Shows

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Construction workers are on the job in Simi Valley, Calif., earlier this week. Nationally, hiring resumed in January although the labor market still has a big hole to climb out of. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

U.S. Adds Just 49,000 Jobs In January, 'Not Anywhere Close' To Recovering Those Lost

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The U.S. economy slowed sharply in the last three months of the year from the previous quarter as the pandemic made a resurgence and businesses had to close. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Economy Slows Sharply As Pandemic Resurges

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