Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
Stories By

Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The Wealthy Getting Less Scrutiny On Taxes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925501102/925501103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Should The Rising Federal Deficit Be Considered In Pandemic Relief Talks?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925278702/925278703" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hundreds of unemployed Kentucky residents wait in long lines outside the Kentucky Career Center in Frankfort for help with their unemployment claims on June 19. New research shows savings built up by the jobless are starting to run out. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Sommers II/Getty Images

'I'm Still Unemployed': Millions In Dire Situation As Savings Start To Run Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/924682991/924786290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Pandemic Thins Out Savings Of Unemployed Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/924648196/924648197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two American Professors Win Nobel Prize In Economics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/923066305/923066309" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Nobel Prize gold medal during manufacture at the Swedish Mint. Each laureate receives the medal, which has the likeness of Alfred Nobel on its face. Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint) hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)

'Auctions Are Everywhere': 2020 Economics Nobel Goes To 2 Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/922936574/922988459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stanford Professors Win Nobel In Economics For Understanding And Designing Auctions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/922936018/922936019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Americans Struggle To Make Ends Meet As Chaos Surrounds Talks For More Pandemic Aid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/921287302/921287303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies last month during a House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing. Powell continues to warn the U.S. economy needs more stimulus to recover from the pandemic. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dietsch/AP

U.S. Employers Added 661,000 Jobs In September

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/919658684/919658708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Last month, women left jobs at four times the rate that men did. A new school year with children staying home instead of returning to classrooms in person led many women to drop out of the workforce. Tom Werner/DigitalVision/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Werner/DigitalVision/Getty Images

Enough Already: Multiple Demands Causing Women To Abandon Workforce

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/919517914/919831136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The stock market fell after President Trump tested positive for the coronavirus at a time when investors were already getting concerned about the pace of the economic recovery and the lack of a new stimulus bill from Congress. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Positive Coronavirus Test Result Roils Financial Markets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/919411749/919423983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript