Scott Horsley Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent.
Scott Horsley 2010
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Scott Horsley

Doby Photography/NPR
Scott Horsley 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Scott Horsley

Chief Economics Correspondent

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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Malaysia Hammond places flowers at a memorial mural for George Floyd in Minneapolis on Sunday. Police brutality has sparked days of civil unrest. But the sparks have landed in a tinderbox built over decades of economic inequality, now exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

From Jobs To Homeownership, Protests Put Spotlight On Economic Divide

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Consumer Spending Plunged More Than 13 Percent In April Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

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Revisiting Common Economy Questions And Reconnecting With Past Callers, Continued

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Revisiting Common Economy Questions And Reconnecting With Past Callers

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President Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He signed a preliminary trade agreement at the White House on Jan. 15. Since then, tensions between the two countries have grown. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

U.S.-China Tensions Were Already High. Pandemic And Hong Kong Have Made Things Worse

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Workers prepare takeout orders May 1 in Houston. For more than two out of three unemployed workers, jobless benefits exceed their old pay, researchers say. That discrepancy can raise awkward questions for workers, bosses and policymakers. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

For Many, $600 Jobless Benefit Makes It Hard To Return To Work

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Businesses Complain Generous Jobless Benefits Make It Hard To Find Workers

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Joe Biden Faces Backlash After Comments On Popular Black Radio Show

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Coronavirus Update: Unemployment Numbers Keep Growing Across The U.S.

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A woman looks at signs at a store in Niles, Ill., on May 13. Shutdowns related to the coronavirus pandemic have left tens of millions out of work. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

38.6 Million Have Filed For Unemployment Since March

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Economic Responses To Coronavirus Pandemic Vary Worldwide

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Coronavirus Update: CDC Publishes A Report About The Coronavirus Outbreak In Arkansas

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The Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday heard testimony about coronavirus economic relief efforts from Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a virtual hearing of the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday. Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell spoke about the rescue package passed by the Congress in March. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images